Supervisors


Dr Andrew Beckerman

Dr Andrew Beckerman

The University of Sheffield

Evolutionary Ecologist and Conservation Biologist working at the interface of Genes, Populations, Food Webs…. and Parrots

Aquatic Communities
• Algae and Daphnia Defences, Predator Induced Phenotypic Plasticity
Food Webs
• Foraging Biology and the Structure and Complexity of Communities
Parrots
•Conservation and Demography of Amazon Parrots with the World Parrot Trust

Dr Alison Wright

Dr Alison Wright

The University of Sheffield

Males and females of many species across the animal kingdom often look and behave very differently. However, the two sexes share an almost identical set of genes. So, how do these remarkable sex differences arise?

Sex chromosomes are the only region of the genome to differ between females and males, and are, therefore, predicted to play key roles in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. My research is centered on understanding the genomic and evolutionary processes underlying sex differences. In particular, I am interested in:

• the origins and turnover of sex chromosome systems
• sex chromosome degeneration
• role of the sex chromosomes in sexual dimorphism
• evolution of gene expression and dosage compensation
• genome evolution and sexual selection.

Prof Andy Fenton

Prof Andy Fenton

The University of Liverpool

I am interested in understanding the occurrence and consequences of interactions between species in natural communities – with a particular focus on infectious diseases. My work focuses on the use of simple mathematical theory, coupled with experimental perturbations of natural systems, to reveal the extent to which species interact, and whether those interactions are important for the dynamics of each species, or the stability of the community as a whole.
In terms of infectious diseases, I am particularly interested in whether co-circulating and co-infecting parasite species interact inside hosts, and whether those interactions affect the host’s susceptibility to infection or disease by other parasites. I am also interested in how multiple host species combine to determine the transmission and persistence of parasites at the host community level.

Prof Andrew Hodson

Prof Andrew Hodson

The University of Sheffield

Andy’s research largely takes places in the Arctic and Antarctica. Since climate warming signals can be so strong here, he considers the implications of ground thaw and glacier melt for the sensitive ecosystems that are often found at or near the ice margin. He also looks at the microbial ecosystems within the ice itself, since there are fewer habitats more vulnerable to the impacts of climate warming than ice and snow.

In the Arctic, Andy is currently leading a large European project funded via several national research councils (the Joint Programming Initiative). The emphasis of this project called “LowPerm” is the biogeochemical feedbacks associated with lowland permafrost thaw in the High Arctic. A video about the work that inspired this project can be seen here. http://lowperm.group.shef.ac.uk/

Dr Ann Rowan

Dr Ann Rowan

The University of Sheffield

Ann is a Research Fellow in Geography. Her research interests include:
The response of mountain glaciers to climate change
Geomorphology and dynamics of debris-covered glaciers
Glacier and hydrological change in the Himalaya

Dr Alistair Derby

Dr Alistair Derby

The University of Liverpool

Bioinformatics and Modelling
Evolutionary Ecology
Ecology, Evolution and Genomics of Infectious Disease
Microbiology

Dr Amy Pedersen

My research focuses on the importance of multi-host parasites and in particular on the factors that drive disease emergence. Much research in disease ecology and evolution focuses on the one host–one parasite framework. And yet, in natural systems, hosts are usually co-infected by multiple parasites, and many parasites can infect several host species. I focus on understanding host-parasite interactions in this realistic context. My past and current work have sought to significantly expand this perspective by (i) evaluating the interactions that occur between co-infecting parasites and their implications for host health and (ii) to advance our knowledge of how multi-host parasites contribute to disease emergence.

Dr Anu Thompson

No biographical info given.

Prof Ben Hatchwell

Prof Ben Hatchwell

The University of Sheffield

My principal research interest is in social evolution and reproductive strategies. The main approach of my research is to use field observations and experiments to test evolutionary theory.
Specific research interests and achievements include:
The ecological factors that promote the evolution of animal societies.
The influence of individual dispersal decisions on the genetic structure of populations and the consequences for cooperative behaviour.
The alternative reproductive strategies of individuals in cooperative groups and their fitness consequences.
Mechanisms of kin recognition in social animals.
Proximate and ultimate causes of variation in parental investment.
I am also interested in avian population ecology, including long-term studies of seabirds and the ecology of urban bird populations.

Dr Ben Woodcock

Dr Ben Woodcock

Ben Woodcock is an Ecological Entomologist in the Community Ecology Group at CEH Wallingford. He is involved in research that develops applied management solutions to enhancing ecosystems service delivery and biodiversity within arable and grassland ecosystems. This has focused principally on the development of agri-environment schemes, which are the main policy mechanism for changing the management of UK farming systems. His research has included projects for both the UK government (e.g. Defra and Natural England) and private sector (Syngenta).

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

The University of Liverpool

My current research interests centre on three areas: (i) sexual conflicts and the operation of sexual selection, (ii) the evolution and function of animal communication systems, and (iii) the optimization of conservation efforts. I investigate these topics taking theoretical as well as empirical approaches, primarily using ungulate study systems. My main field site is in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, where I have been running the Mara Antelope Research Project since 1998. I am a member of the IUCN Antelope Specialist Group (since 1994).

Prof Carlos Peres

Prof Carlos Peres

Large-scale patterns of large-bodied vertebrate diversity and abundance in Amazonian forests; effects of different forms on human disturbance, including hunting, habitat fragmentation, wildfires, natural regeneration, and fast-growing tree plantations on Amazonian biodiversity; population ecology and management of natural resources in tropical forests; reserve selection and design criteria in relation to regional gradients of biodiversity value and implementation costs.

Prof Charles Wellman

Prof Charles Wellman

The University of Sheffield

My research addresses the highly topical and controversial problem of the origin and early evolution of land plants. My research integrates evidence from both fossil and living plants. Fossil evidence is in the form of early land plant megafossils and dispersed microfossils—spores and fragments. I am currently working on material from China, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Kazakhstan and Spitsbergen. I study living plants in order to interpret the earliest land plant fossils [specifically through: (i) cladistic analyses of evolutionary relationships; (ii) molecular clock analyses of evolutionary divergence times; (iii) analysis of physiological adaptations required for plants to invade the land (particularly Evo-Devo studies on the molecular genetics of spore/pollen wall development)]. I am also exploring the impact of the invasion of the land by plants on global change. This has led to research into developing a novel (and currently only) proxy for past UV-B radiation. In recent years I have also extended my research back in time to examine a previously neglected research area considering the ‘algal scum’ that inhabited the land before it was invaded by plants.

Prof Chris Evans

Prof Chris Evans

Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem biogeochemistry, with a focus on semi-natural and managed uplands and peatlands. Interests include:
Trends and drivers of change in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems.
Field-scale measurement of fluxes and controls on the carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of natural, managed and restored peatlands in temperate and tropical regions, and the potential role of restoration and mitigation measures in reducing GHG emissions.
Sources, processing and fate of terrestrially-derived organic matter in aquatic ecosystems, from headwater streams and lakes to estuaries and coastal waters, and the contribution of this flux to anthropogenic GHG emissions
Controls on the cycling of atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur in terrestrial ecosystems, including controls on leaching to surface waters, ecosystem nitrogen saturation, recovery from acidification, the role modifying land-use factors such as forestry, grazing and burning, and links on the carbon cycle.
Impacts of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, particularly in relation to water quality extremes and their ecological impacts.
Ecosystem-scale biogeochemical modelling of the impacts of atmospheric N and S deposition, ozone (O3), climate change and land-use on terrestrial productivity, C balance, soil and water chemistry and plant species diversity.
Synthesis of scientific understanding to take account of multiple anthropogenic drivers and ecosystem functions in support of the policy, particularly in relation to land-management.

Prof Chris Thomas

Prof Chris Thomas

The University of York

Chris and his research group are interested in understanding how humans have transformed the biological world, and how humans might protect the world’s remaining biodiversity. His research and scientific publications fall into three main areas:

Why and how species respond to climate change. Chris was the first to estimate how climate change might endanger biodiversity at a global scale. His research group has provided evidence that species move their geographic distributions as the climate changes (YouTube interview), and they are currently evaluating distribution changes and evolution in species that are responding to climate change.

Dr Colin Beale

Dr Colin Beale

The University of York

I work on a wide range of ecological problems from population dynamics and distributions to fire ecology in the African savannah. The main linking thread of my research is a fundamental interest in spatial processes in ecology, from the way individual animals move across a landscape, through the patterns and processes that shape individual species distributions, to global patterns in biodiversity. I’m interested in understanding all aspects of spatial variation in ecological processes at a range of spatial scales, using and developing appropriate statistical techniques alongside an active programme of field research in the UK and Africa. Currently, many species distributions are shifting as a consequence of global climate change and I’m also interested in the demographic processes that drive such shifts. Much of my work focusses on birds and I collaborate with conservation organisations to ensure that a variety of additional interests tackle problems of practical significance.

Prof Colin Brown

Prof Colin Brown

The University of York

Current research focuses on integrated catchment management, working within the Water Friendly Farming platform to design and test interventions that deliver co-benefits for downstream flood risk, sediment delivery to water, as well as water quality (nutrients, pesticides) and aquatic biodiversity. Colin has advised UK Government through membership of the Advisory Committee on Pesticides and chairing its Environmental Panel. He has chaired a European working group on Environmental Risk Assessment, and the BioResources Group of the Society of Chemical Industry. He Chairs the conference on Pesticide Behaviour in Soils, Water and Air held every four years in York. Colin is Associate Dean (Research) within the Faculty of Sciences (2015-2019).

Dr Colin McClean

Dr Colin McClean

The University of York

General research interests involve the application of spatial analysis and GIS to environmental management. Research efforts in geography, the environmental sciences, ecology and environmental economics are strongly linked by the spatial distributions of the phenomena they seek to study. Many working in the field of GIS aim to develop new manipulation and analysis tools, however, the potential applications of relatively simple GIS analysis, in all of the above areas of study, has only begun to be explored. The major limitation to the exploitation of the tools that have been developed has been the paucity and quality of existing spatial data sets. These datasets are increasingly available, providing opportunities to consider environmental problems at the landscape, regional and global scales, where before only field-level studies might have been possible.

Dr Darrel Swift

The University of Sheffield

Glacial erosion and long-term landscape evolution
Glacial sediment systems and landform evolution processes
Luminescence as a process tracer in glacial sediment systems
Glacier hydrology and fluvioglacial sediment systems

Dr Dylan Childs

Dr Dylan Childs

The University of Sheffield

Life history theory – Characterising optimal reproductive strategies and components of selection in free-living populations.
Evolutionary demography – Application of evolutionary game theory (aka adaptive dynamics) to long-term demographic datasets.
Structured population modelling – Construction / parameterisation of accurate demographic models (e.g. integral projection models).
Host-parasite dynamics – Exploring the impact of environmental variation on dynamics (e.g. seasonal forcing in malaria)

Prof David Beerling

Prof David Beerling

The University of Sheffield

My interdisciplinary research group focuses on fundamental questions concerning how photosynthetic terrestrial ecosystems and the global environment co-evolved over the last half billion years. Our approach integrates evidence from fossils, experiments with terrestrial organisms, and rigorous theoretical models applied across spatial scales. We focus particularly on key processes and interactions important for revealing insights into the conquest of the land by plants, and the role of terrestrial ecosystems in shaping global ecology, climate and atmospheric composition. Our research findings also inform understanding of current anthropogenic climate change issues facing humanity.

Dr Donatella Zona

Dr Donatella Zona

The University of Sheffield

My main research emphasizes the impact of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and greenhouse gas emission (CO2 and CH4) in the Arctic.
My interest ranges from the mechanisms allowing tundra ecosystems to adjust or avoid environmental stress and how climate change affects ecosystem functioning to the importance and the challenges of integrating different scales and approaches to understanding the patterns and controls on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic.

Dr David Edwards

Dr David Edwards

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on understanding the impacts of land-use change on tropical biodiversity. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of managing tropical landscapes for biodiversity protection and the mechanisms that can be used to fund protection, although I have a range of interests, including:
Impacts of logging management on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning;
Tropical agriculture and sustainability;
The interaction between climate change and land-use change on extinction risk;
Cost-effective conservation within the tropics;
Policy drivers of tropical forest protection, including REDD+ and sustainability labeling;
Mechanisms of maintenance in mutualism;

Dr David Atkinson

Dr David Atkinson

The University of Liverpool

My passion is ecological and biological synthesis that brings new understanding of impacts of climatic and other environmental perturbation on organisms and ecosystems.Our investigations focus particularly on the fundamental impacts of temperature, body size and resource flux on rates of biological processes at levels of organization ranging from individuals to ecosystems. These biological processes include individual resource uptake, growth, development, population growth, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. We work at the interface of ecology, evolution and physiology, and our approaches include advancing new theory, including a novel metabolic scaling theory; performing experiments on whole pond ecosystems and populations; and carrying out meta-analyses to quantify global trends.

Dr Daniel Chapman

Dr Daniel Chapman

I lead projects modelling the dispersal, spread and impacts of non-native invasive plants and pest organisms. These models are important in understanding the biological processes driving invasion and for planning effective control strategies.
Major science questions include:

Are large-scale patterns of invasion constrained by species dispersal, global transport networks and climate?
What are the best ways to conduct surveillance and control of invasive species?
What is the role of trait adaptation in promoting invasion?
How do invasive non-native species integrate into ecological networks?

Prof Douglas Yu

Prof Douglas Yu

We study cooperation in two of its manifestations:
Conservation (cooperation between humans and nature) and
Mutualisms (cooperation between species).
See my personal webpage for more detail: www.douglasyu.org/research/

Dr David Rippin

Dr David Rippin

The University of York

My research interests are focussed on the controls on the dynamics of glaciers and ice-sheets, and the use of ground-based and airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) techniques in exploring englacial and subglacial environments. I also work on the thermal evolution of small Arctic glaciers, and is increasingly interested in supraglacial environments, and devising approaches for monitoring change in these locations.

Dr Elva Robinson

Dr Elva Robinson

I am a lecturer at the University of York, working on social behaviour. Social structure in animal groups affects how robust a population is to stresses such as disease, disturbance by humans, or habitat fragmentation. Effects of environmental change on animal social structure are challenging to study but have wide reaching implications for conservation and management. My research uses fieldwork, laboratory experiments and theoretical modelling. I use ants as a model system which can be manipulated at both the individual and group levels, allowing thorough exploration of the rules governing social behaviour and interaction with the environment.

Dr Francis Daunt

Dr Francis Daunt

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
My main interests lie in understanding the drivers of change in seabird populations. North Sea seabirds have shown recent population declines, and my research aims to understand the effects of climate change, disease, fisheries and marine energy developments. My approach is to gain a detailed understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of individual behaviour and physiology that determine demographic parameters.

Dr Gareth Fraser

Dr Gareth Fraser

The University of Sheffield

Evolution and development of jaws and teeth
Evolutionary history of vertebrate innovations
Genetic basis of morphological diversity
My research is focused on the evolution and development of morphological diversity in fishes. I am interested in a range of evo-devo models from cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi to the catshark. I investigate a range of themes (i) how genetic networks maintain the continuous production of teeth, (ii) genetic mechanisms affecting dental diversity, (iii) the evolution and development of the pharyngeal/branchial arches, and (iv) the evolution of sensory elaborations in early vertebrates

Dr Gareth Phoenix

Dr Gareth Phoenix

The University of Sheffield

In the Phoenix lab we study the interactions between plants and the environment, particularly in Arctic, northern boreal and upland ecosystems.

Our research includes the impacts of climate change (warming, extreme events, snow regime change, precipitation), UV-B radiation and pollution on ecosystem structure and function. We study the impacts on biodiversity, on cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and the consequences for feedback to climate (ecosystem carbon balance). We also aim to understand how responses observed at the vegetation/ecosystem level are driven by individual plant, root and leaf responses.

Dr Garry Hayman

Dr Garry Hayman

Garry’s current research interests cover terrestrial biosphere and land-atmosphere interactions and the use of Earth Observation data for model evaluation. He is currently involved in a number of projects concerning methane emissions from boreal and African wetlands (NERC African Wetlands and NERC Methane and other Greenhouse Gases in the Arctic – measurements, process studies and modelling), which use surface and satellite atmospheric methane measurements to assess the methane wetland emission parameterisation in the JULES land surface model (https://jules.jchmr.org/).

Dr Gavin Thomas

Dr Gavin Thomas

The University of Sheffield

Phylogeny, diversification and trait evolution
My research focuses on modelling the diversification of species and traits at a macroevolutionary scale. I am particularly interested in how we can use information on the phylogenetic relationships among species to infer how present-day biodiversity has arisen over time and ask:

How and why do lineages and traits diversify?
What are the consequences of varying tempo and mode of lineage and trait evolution for temporal and spatial patterns of diversity?
My lab is currently preoccupied with collecting a large database of bill shapes and plumage colours from all extant bird species (~10,000 species) using museum study skins (mainly the NHM at Tring and also the University of Manchester Museum).
You can get involved with this ERC-funded project with our Bird bill citizen science website: markmybird.org.

Prof Greg Hurst

Prof Greg Hurst

The University of Liverpool

Many insects carry microbes that distort their host sex ratio, favouring the production and survival of female hosts. I work to establish:
a) How these microbes change the ecology of their host, in terms of mating system and the spread of sexually transmitted infections.
b) How they drive the evolution of their host, for instance, the evolution of sex-determining systems.
This work uses butterflies, ladybird, Drosophila and Nasonia jewel wasp as model systems in the field and the laboratory.

Prof Grant Bigg

Prof Grant Bigg

The University of Sheffield

The common theme of all my research until recently has been marine climate change. However, many threads contribute to this theme. A major thread is the use, and development, of ocean circulation models to understand climate change on scales from global and millennial to local and sub-monthly. I use a combination of models and remote sensing, with interpreting oceanographic and lower atmospheric data, to increase our understanding of the climatic interaction between the atmosphere and ocean. I use iceberg trajectories to study glacial freshwater inputs to modern and Quaternary oceans. My primary focus of recent years can be divided into the global thermohaline circulation, icebergs and tropical climate change. More recently, however, there has begun to be an increased emphasis on the role environmental change plays in society.
Global thermohaline circulation
Icebergs
Tropical climate change

Dr Ilik Saccheri

The University of Liverpool

My early interest was on the impact of genetic factors on components of fitness and extinction risk in small populations (conservation genetics), and I continue to study the genetic basis of inbreeding depression using butterflies and moths as model systems. The other main thread to my research aims to understand the genetic architecture of rapid adaptation, primarily through reconstructing the evolutionary origins and dynamics of industrial melanism in moths, but also in other contexts.

Prof Jon Slate

Prof Jon Slate

The University of Sheffield

Genetic architecture and evolution of fitness traits in wild populations
Genome mapping
Inbreeding & inbreeding depression

Dr Jack Thomson

Dr Jack Thomson

The University of Liverpool

Most of my work focuses on behavioural ecology, examining intraspecific variation in personality amongst a variety of organisms. Currently my main interests are in aggression and boldness, particularly in fish and in crustaceans.

Dr James Chong

Dr James Chong

The University of York

Molecular biologist with an interest in (anaerobic) microbial communities. My group utilises a range of ‘omics methods to chart dynamic changes.

Dr Jamie Wood

Dr Jamie Wood

The University of York

My current research interests are in the field of complexity and emergent phenomena in biologically inspired models. This is primarily focused on understanding how we may use both computational and analytic techniques in statistical mechanics to further our knowledge of the stability and robustness of natural systems. This is a broad area, and my current work includes: extending models based on James Lovelock’s Daisyworld parable including looking for links to established theories in quantitative genetics; investigating flocking or herding behaviour in animals, and how these systems can be related to models of network rewiring; developing primitive models of quorum sensing in bacteria, especially understanding spatial effects and how this may lead to biofilm formation.

Prof Jane Hill

Prof Jane Hill

The University of York

Jane’s research group studies the impacts of climate change and habitat loss on species, with fieldwork in Britain and Borneo. Jane’s Ph.D. examined migration in UK moths and her research has mainly focused on the environmental factors affecting population dynamics of butterflies and moths since then. After post-doc research in Birmingham, Leeds, and Durham Universities, Jane joined the University of York in 2001 and became Professor of Ecology in 2010. Current research projects are studying climate-driven range shifts of species at their leading-edge (i.e patterns of colonisation and range expansion) and trailing-edge range boundaries (i.e. local extinction rates), and the factors affecting species’ ability to respond to climate and habitat changes (including investigating evidence for evolutionary adaptation to climate). We are exploring potential methods for promoting adaptation of biodiversity to climate warming, for example by examining whether or not improving habitat connectivity will aid species’ range shifts and the role of Protected Areas. We are also exploring issues around the environmental sustainability of oil palm cultivation and testing certification standards.
Jane is a trustee of the SE Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, a trustee and member of Council of the British Ecological Society, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society. She received a Marsh/ZSL Award for Conservation Biology in 2011. Jane is involved in promoting women in science and led the York Biology Department to an Athena SWAN Gold Award in 2014.

Prof Jane Hurst

Prof Jane Hurst

The University of Liverpool

My main interests are in the functions, mechanisms and evolution of scent communication in mammals, animal welfare (particularly in relation to laboratory animals), rodent pest control, and the interactions between behaviour and disease.

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

The University of York

My group’s research is focused on the structural analysis of biologically-active molecules in order to understand better their mechanism of action at the molecular level. Our primary technique is mass spectrometry, which we use in conjunction with a wide variety of other analytical techniques, including chemical, enzymatic and separations strategies, principally for application in proteomic and metabolomic studies. The group’s research has an emphasis on pursuing long-term, integrated studies of biological systems, which means that multidisciplinary collaborations are of prime importance; we are very fortunate in having a range of ongoing projects with a set of long-term and expert collaborators.

Dr Jenny Hodgson

Dr Jenny Hodgson

The University of Liverpool

I am a conservation biologist. I research how the spatial arrangement of land use and management affects the viability of species, and how climate change interacts with land use. I use a mixture of empirical and modelling approaches.

I serve as Early Career Researcher representative on the ACCE management board and I hope to represent the views of ECR supervisors in general. If you are an ECR and potential supervisor at any ACCE institution, please email me to be added to my mailing list.

Dr Jon Pitchford

No biographical info given.

Dr Jon Green

Dr Jon Green

The University of Liverpool

My research interests lie at the interface of the traditional disciplines of ecology, physiology and behaviour. My work focuses on seabirds, as these animals must adapt be adapted to two contrasting environments: the challenges of foraging in a big, deep, cold, dark, distant water body are very different to those that they face while breeding and moulting on land. Furthermore, both of these environments and their associated challenges change naturally on a seasonal and annual basis and are under anthropogenic threats from over-fishing, climate change and renewable energy developments.

Prof Jonathan Sharples

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Blanchard

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Ferrari

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Dr Karl Bates

The University of Liverpool

My research concentrates on the functional anatomy of terrestrial vertebrates, with particular focus on the locomotor system. My goal is to understand the links between morphology and limb biomechanics in order
 to better characterize how animals achieve their full range of habitual motions. This has led
 me to study a range of living tetrapods from primates to archosaurs in order to further our understanding of major evolutionary transitions in locomotor biomechanics.

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

The University of York

Research centres on understanding the process of speciation in heliconiine and ithomiine butterflies. Both groups of butterflies are found in the neotropics and are noted for the diversity of wing colour patterns found within species, as well as also for mimetic convergence of colour patterns between species (Müllarian mimicry).

Making use of the Heliconius melpomene reference genome, the current focus involves using high-throughput sequencing approaches to understand the speciation process at the scale of the genome. In particular we are investigating genome-wide patterns of divergence, adaptive introgression, and quantifying the amount of genomic exchange between species.

Dr Karl Evans

No biographical info given.

Dr Kate Parr

Dr Kate Parr

The University of Liverpool

I am a community ecologist with a particular interest in understanding how tropical grassy systems are structured, how they function and the best way to conserve them. Much of my work, and that of my research group, focuses on invertebrates – particularly social insects.

Dr Kathryn Arnold

Dr Kathryn Arnold

The University of York

Ecologist, working mainly on the behavioural and physiological responses of vertebrates to changes in the environment. My current research falls mainly into two areas: 1) the assessment of exposure to and effects of contaminants on wildlife and 2) the ecology of rural and urban birds. However, I also maintain an interest in the social behaviour of birds, insects, fish and manta rays.

Dr Kelly Redeker

No biographical info given.

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

The University of Liverpool

My overarching research interest is how animals (and primarily humans) move. That is very general, so in my work I focus on musculo-skeletal biomechanics, with evolutionary aspects always (at least) in the back of my mind.
I am particulary interested in the biomechanics of the healthy human shod and unshod foot.

Dr Lisa Emberson

No biographical info given.

Prof Lorraine Maltby

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Bateman

Prof Mark Bateman

The University of Sheffield

My high profile collaborative research focuses on past aeolian landscapes as an archive for better understanding past depositional processes and environmental changes. Three themes are centred around this:
– As aeolian deposits, both arid zone and cold-climate, are widespread in the Quaternary sedimentary record they can provide key data for understanding previous palaeoenvironmental conditions and inform the archaeological record;
– Novel applications of luminescence dating has allowed a better understanding of the integrity of preserved sandy sediments;
– Research is also currently trying to extend the application of luminescence dating to glacial and ice marginal sediments.

Dr Mirre Simons

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Hodson

No biographical info given.

Prof Mike Begon

Prof Mike Begon

The University of Liverpool

The ecology of infectious diseases in wildlife populations, especially diseases transmisible to humans, both within the UK and worldwide (e.g. leptospirosis in Brazilian favelas and bubonic plague in Central Asia).

Prof Michael Brockhurst

Prof Michael Brockhurst

The University of York

Rapid contemporary evolution can have important applied consequences, and particularly so in microbes, whose short generation times and large populations potentiate high evolutionary rates. My lab employs a diversity of study systems and a broad range of approaches including laboratory experimental evolution, surveys of natural communities, analysis of clinical samples, next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modelling to address both pure and applied research questions in coevolution, diversification and adaptation.

Dr Nigel Dunnett

No biographical info given.

Dr Nicola Nadeau

Dr Nicola Nadeau

The University of Sheffield

The evolution and genetics of colour pattern variation
The genetic and developmental control of structural colours in animals
The process of divergence and speciation within the genome
The genetic analysis of natural hybrid zones to identify loci under selection.
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of adaptive evolution, speciation and sexual selection in natural populations. The major focus of my current research is the evolution and genetics of convergent iridescent structural colour in Heliconius butterflies.

Dr. Nick Isaac

No biographical info given.

Dr Nathan Jeffery

No biographical info given.

Dr. Niall McNamara

No biographical info given.

Dr Oliver Craig

Dr Oliver Craig

The University of York

Specialises in biomolecular archaeology, i.e. the recovery of proteins, lipids and DNA from ancient skeletal remains and archaeological artefacts to provide insights into past human activities.
His particular interests lie in temporal transitions and variability in human diets, cuisine and subsistence practices and the impact that dietary changes had on social evolution, health and the environment.
Oliver is interested in combining a broad range of analytical techniques to study palaeodiet but particularly stable isotope analysis of human bone and organic residue analysis of food remains on ceramics.His research has focused on the analysis of materials from key prehistoric sites in Central and Eastern Europe and along the North East Atlantic, Baltic and Mediterranean coastlines.

Prof Owen Petchey

No biographical info given.

Prof Paul Blackwell

Prof Paul Blackwell

The University of Sheffield

I mainly work in Bayesian statistics; I am interested in the development of new models and methodology, particularly inference for random processes, driven by real applications which are primarily in ecology but also in environmental science, archaeology and other areas. I am also interested in stochastic modelling, statistics and simulation more generally, again often with ecological and environmental applications.

Prof Paula Stockley

Prof Paula Stockley

The University of Liverpool

My research aims to explain diversity in animal reproductive traits, with emphasis on mechanisms and evolutionary consequences of sperm competition and sexual selection, particularly in mammals. I also have broad interests in the fields of behavioural and evolutionary ecology relating to reproductive strategies, life history evolution and social behaviour. Current projects include experimental and comparative studies of ejaculate expenditure, copulatory behaviour, genital evolution, male mate choice and female competition. Multidisciplinary collaborations apply molecular and proteomics techniques to address evolutionary questions within these areas.

Prof Philip H Warren

No biographical info given.

Dr Penny Spikins

No biographical info given.

Dr Peter Mayhew

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Prof J Peter W Young

No biographical info given.

Prof Piran White

No biographical info given.

Prof Rob Freckleton

Prof Rob Freckleton

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on modelling population and community dynamics. I am particularly interested in large scale population dynamics, although have a range of interests, including:
Plant population ecology, modelling plant populations, modelling weed populations.
Evolutionary ecology, phylogenetic comparative methodology and its application to ecological problems.
Theoretical ecology, statistical methodology.

Dr Rob Bryant

No biographical info given.

Dr Bob Johnston

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on the environmental histories of landscapes in the UK, with a specific interest in the uplands and the coastal fringe of northwest Wales. I am working with PhD students on late Holocene sea level change in north Cardigan Bay and the impacts of future climate change on estuarine landscapes of SW Snowdonia.

Prof Roger Butlin

Prof Roger Butlin

The University of Sheffield

My research is concerned primarily with the origin of barriers to gene exchange, especially the evolutionary genetics of reproductive isolation. I have used insect acoustic and chemical signals as model systems to investigate the controversial process of reinforcement, particularly in parapatry, and questions such as the inheritance of signal characters and the form of female preferences. I am currently working with hybrid zones in grasshoppers of the genus Chorthippus, and collaborating in projects on speciation in winkles (Littorina), and signal and response evolution in the Drosophila virilis group. Another area of research concerns the evolution of asexual reproduction using ostracods as models. I am interested in evolution at range margins and its implications for conservation genetics. Current projects use Arabidopsis lyrata and other models. I collaborate in studies of population structure and sexual segregation in bats, behaviour of zebrafish, ecology and evolution of mosquitoes and beetle phylogeography.

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

The University of Sheffield

NERC IRF at the Department of Animal & Plant Science of the University of Sheffield. He joined the faculty in 2016 as an NERC IRF. His research group (@SalGoTeam) focuses on understanding the mechanisms that constrain and diversify life history traits and life history strategies in animals and plants. His work uses a combination of approaches that include functional ecology, population ecology, comparative biology and formal demography.

2002: BSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz, Spain
2004: MSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz & Kingston Univ, UK
2011: Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity, Univ Pennsylvania, USA

Dr Rhonda Snook

Dr Rhonda Snook

The University of Sheffield

Reproduction and development define life and therefore are fundamental to understanding the evolution of biodiversity. My primary research interest is the evolution of reproductive strategies, focussing on gamete evolution, fertilisation, sexual selection, and speciation. I have addressed these areas using Drosophila fruit flies as model systems. My lab uses a variety of different approaches to study reproductive strategies, including population and quantitative genetics, experimental evolution, and recently next generation sequencing, at both a population and landscape scales. Current projects include the evolution of postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation and how climate change may impact reproduction.

Prof Richard Shore

No biographical info given.

Prof Roland Gehrels

Prof Roland Gehrels

The University of York

I grew up in the Netherlands where I studied Quaternary Geology at the Free University in Amsterdam. I completed a PhD at the University of Maine in Geology in 1994 and continued my academic career as a sea-level scientist, first as a postdoc at Durham University, and then for 18 years at Plymouth University. In 2013 I accepted a Chair in Physical Geography at the University of York. In the past decade my research efforts have focussed primarily on the coupling of geological field evidence with tide-gauge observations to reconstruct historical sea-level changes using proxy methods. My main achievement is the reconstruction of the acceleration of sea-level rise during the first decades of the 20th century in sites around the North Atlantic and the Southwest Pacific. This work has led to the realisation that recent rapid sea-level changes occur on a global scale and are linked to global warming. In recent years my research has taken on a new societal dimension with relevance for sea-level predictions. An example of this is my involvement in the iGlass project (http://www.highstand.org/iglass) which represents an attempt to apply the sea-level reconstruction methods developed for Holocene intertidal sediments to earlier interglacial sequences, with direct implications for understanding the dynamics of ice sheets.

Prof Steven Banwart

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Livingstone

Dr Stephen Livingstone

My research interests are in reconstructing ice sheets and their dynamics from geological and geophysical evidence in both marine and terrestrial environments. They can be summarised as follows:

1. Investigating the drainage and storage of meltwater at the bed of (palaeo-)ice sheets.
2. The identification and investigation of landform-sediment assemblages and physical processes at the bed of palaeo-ice streams, and the controls governing their retreat.
4. Reconstructing the Late Quaternary history and dynamics of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet.

Prof Steve Paterson

No biographical info given.

Dr Seth Barribeau

No biographical info given.

Dr Samantha Patrick

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Cornell

Dr Stephen Cornell

The University of Liverpool

Member of the evolutionary ecology research group seek to understand ecological and evolutionary patterns in nature, and to understand the feedback between ecology and evolution. Our work is diverse in terms of the organisms we study, the questions we investigate, and the approaches we use.

Prof. Terry Burke

No biographical info given.

Dr Tom Webb

Dr Tom Webb

The University of Sheffield

My primary research interest is in the macroecology of marine ecosystems. In particular, I am interested in how and why marine biodiversity is unevenly distributed in space and time. This interest has led me into the realm of biodiversity informatics – using large databases of different facets of marine diversity in order to synthesise the state of knowledge of the world’s oceans. My research is currently focused on three major areas:
Global patterns and trends in marine biodiversity – interrogating, linking, and extracting trends from major biodiversity databases using novel statistical methods
Comparative analysis of marine and terrestrial ecosystems – to what extent does ecological theory generalise across realms?
Dynamics of UK marine systems – integrating data and models to understand the provision of ecosystem services from UK seas.

Dr Thomas Price

Dr Thomas Price

The University of Liverpool

My main focus is selfish genetic elements and the ways that conflicts within the genome of individuals impact on the development and behaviour of individuals, the survival of populations, and in changing species at the landscape scale. In particular, I work on meiotic drive- selfish X chromosomes that spread by killing Y chromosome sperm, causing all female broods and distorting the sex ratios of whole populations. I try to understand the mechanisms that underly these drivers, and their ecological and evolutionary impacts on sex, speciation and survival.

A second theme is why some females choose to mate with only one male in their life, while others may mate with dozens a day.

More broadly, I also work on sexual cannibalism in mantids and spiders with my ACCE student, Adam Fisher. I also collaborate with ACCE student Chloe Heys on trying to understand why parrots masturbate so much.

Dr Virpi Lummaa

No biographical info given.

Dr Ville Friman

No biographical info given.

Prof George Wolff

No biographical info given.

Dr Zen Lewis

No biographical info given.

Dr Andrew Beckerman

Dr Andrew Beckerman

The University of Sheffield

Evolutionary Ecologist and Conservation Biologist working at the interface of Genes, Populations, Food Webs…. and Parrots

Aquatic Communities
• Algae and Daphnia Defences, Predator Induced Phenotypic Plasticity
Food Webs
• Foraging Biology and the Structure and Complexity of Communities
Parrots
•Conservation and Demography of Amazon Parrots with the World Parrot Trust

Dr Alison Wright

Dr Alison Wright

The University of Sheffield

Males and females of many species across the animal kingdom often look and behave very differently. However, the two sexes share an almost identical set of genes. So, how do these remarkable sex differences arise?

Sex chromosomes are the only region of the genome to differ between females and males, and are, therefore, predicted to play key roles in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. My research is centered on understanding the genomic and evolutionary processes underlying sex differences. In particular, I am interested in:

• the origins and turnover of sex chromosome systems
• sex chromosome degeneration
• role of the sex chromosomes in sexual dimorphism
• evolution of gene expression and dosage compensation
• genome evolution and sexual selection.

Prof Andy Fenton

Prof Andy Fenton

The University of Liverpool

I am interested in understanding the occurrence and consequences of interactions between species in natural communities – with a particular focus on infectious diseases. My work focuses on the use of simple mathematical theory, coupled with experimental perturbations of natural systems, to reveal the extent to which species interact, and whether those interactions are important for the dynamics of each species, or the stability of the community as a whole.
In terms of infectious diseases, I am particularly interested in whether co-circulating and co-infecting parasite species interact inside hosts, and whether those interactions affect the host’s susceptibility to infection or disease by other parasites. I am also interested in how multiple host species combine to determine the transmission and persistence of parasites at the host community level.

Prof Andrew Hodson

Prof Andrew Hodson

The University of Sheffield

Andy’s research largely takes places in the Arctic and Antarctica. Since climate warming signals can be so strong here, he considers the implications of ground thaw and glacier melt for the sensitive ecosystems that are often found at or near the ice margin. He also looks at the microbial ecosystems within the ice itself, since there are fewer habitats more vulnerable to the impacts of climate warming than ice and snow.

In the Arctic, Andy is currently leading a large European project funded via several national research councils (the Joint Programming Initiative). The emphasis of this project called “LowPerm” is the biogeochemical feedbacks associated with lowland permafrost thaw in the High Arctic. A video about the work that inspired this project can be seen here. http://lowperm.group.shef.ac.uk/

Dr Ann Rowan

Dr Ann Rowan

The University of Sheffield

Ann is a Research Fellow in Geography. Her research interests include:
The response of mountain glaciers to climate change
Geomorphology and dynamics of debris-covered glaciers
Glacier and hydrological change in the Himalaya

Dr Alistair Derby

Dr Alistair Derby

The University of Liverpool

Bioinformatics and Modelling
Evolutionary Ecology
Ecology, Evolution and Genomics of Infectious Disease
Microbiology

Dr Amy Pedersen

My research focuses on the importance of multi-host parasites and in particular on the factors that drive disease emergence. Much research in disease ecology and evolution focuses on the one host–one parasite framework. And yet, in natural systems, hosts are usually co-infected by multiple parasites, and many parasites can infect several host species. I focus on understanding host-parasite interactions in this realistic context. My past and current work have sought to significantly expand this perspective by (i) evaluating the interactions that occur between co-infecting parasites and their implications for host health and (ii) to advance our knowledge of how multi-host parasites contribute to disease emergence.

Dr Anu Thompson

No biographical info given.

Prof Ben Hatchwell

Prof Ben Hatchwell

The University of Sheffield

My principal research interest is in social evolution and reproductive strategies. The main approach of my research is to use field observations and experiments to test evolutionary theory.
Specific research interests and achievements include:
The ecological factors that promote the evolution of animal societies.
The influence of individual dispersal decisions on the genetic structure of populations and the consequences for cooperative behaviour.
The alternative reproductive strategies of individuals in cooperative groups and their fitness consequences.
Mechanisms of kin recognition in social animals.
Proximate and ultimate causes of variation in parental investment.
I am also interested in avian population ecology, including long-term studies of seabirds and the ecology of urban bird populations.

Dr Ben Woodcock

Dr Ben Woodcock

Ben Woodcock is an Ecological Entomologist in the Community Ecology Group at CEH Wallingford. He is involved in research that develops applied management solutions to enhancing ecosystems service delivery and biodiversity within arable and grassland ecosystems. This has focused principally on the development of agri-environment schemes, which are the main policy mechanism for changing the management of UK farming systems. His research has included projects for both the UK government (e.g. Defra and Natural England) and private sector (Syngenta).

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

The University of Liverpool

My current research interests centre on three areas: (i) sexual conflicts and the operation of sexual selection, (ii) the evolution and function of animal communication systems, and (iii) the optimization of conservation efforts. I investigate these topics taking theoretical as well as empirical approaches, primarily using ungulate study systems. My main field site is in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, where I have been running the Mara Antelope Research Project since 1998. I am a member of the IUCN Antelope Specialist Group (since 1994).

Prof Carlos Peres

Prof Carlos Peres

Large-scale patterns of large-bodied vertebrate diversity and abundance in Amazonian forests; effects of different forms on human disturbance, including hunting, habitat fragmentation, wildfires, natural regeneration, and fast-growing tree plantations on Amazonian biodiversity; population ecology and management of natural resources in tropical forests; reserve selection and design criteria in relation to regional gradients of biodiversity value and implementation costs.

Prof Charles Wellman

Prof Charles Wellman

The University of Sheffield

My research addresses the highly topical and controversial problem of the origin and early evolution of land plants. My research integrates evidence from both fossil and living plants. Fossil evidence is in the form of early land plant megafossils and dispersed microfossils—spores and fragments. I am currently working on material from China, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Kazakhstan and Spitsbergen. I study living plants in order to interpret the earliest land plant fossils [specifically through: (i) cladistic analyses of evolutionary relationships; (ii) molecular clock analyses of evolutionary divergence times; (iii) analysis of physiological adaptations required for plants to invade the land (particularly Evo-Devo studies on the molecular genetics of spore/pollen wall development)]. I am also exploring the impact of the invasion of the land by plants on global change. This has led to research into developing a novel (and currently only) proxy for past UV-B radiation. In recent years I have also extended my research back in time to examine a previously neglected research area considering the ‘algal scum’ that inhabited the land before it was invaded by plants.

Prof Chris Evans

Prof Chris Evans

Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem biogeochemistry, with a focus on semi-natural and managed uplands and peatlands. Interests include:
Trends and drivers of change in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems.
Field-scale measurement of fluxes and controls on the carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of natural, managed and restored peatlands in temperate and tropical regions, and the potential role of restoration and mitigation measures in reducing GHG emissions.
Sources, processing and fate of terrestrially-derived organic matter in aquatic ecosystems, from headwater streams and lakes to estuaries and coastal waters, and the contribution of this flux to anthropogenic GHG emissions
Controls on the cycling of atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur in terrestrial ecosystems, including controls on leaching to surface waters, ecosystem nitrogen saturation, recovery from acidification, the role modifying land-use factors such as forestry, grazing and burning, and links on the carbon cycle.
Impacts of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, particularly in relation to water quality extremes and their ecological impacts.
Ecosystem-scale biogeochemical modelling of the impacts of atmospheric N and S deposition, ozone (O3), climate change and land-use on terrestrial productivity, C balance, soil and water chemistry and plant species diversity.
Synthesis of scientific understanding to take account of multiple anthropogenic drivers and ecosystem functions in support of the policy, particularly in relation to land-management.

Prof Chris Thomas

Prof Chris Thomas

The University of York

Chris and his research group are interested in understanding how humans have transformed the biological world, and how humans might protect the world’s remaining biodiversity. His research and scientific publications fall into three main areas:

Why and how species respond to climate change. Chris was the first to estimate how climate change might endanger biodiversity at a global scale. His research group has provided evidence that species move their geographic distributions as the climate changes (YouTube interview), and they are currently evaluating distribution changes and evolution in species that are responding to climate change.

Dr Colin Beale

Dr Colin Beale

The University of York

I work on a wide range of ecological problems from population dynamics and distributions to fire ecology in the African savannah. The main linking thread of my research is a fundamental interest in spatial processes in ecology, from the way individual animals move across a landscape, through the patterns and processes that shape individual species distributions, to global patterns in biodiversity. I’m interested in understanding all aspects of spatial variation in ecological processes at a range of spatial scales, using and developing appropriate statistical techniques alongside an active programme of field research in the UK and Africa. Currently, many species distributions are shifting as a consequence of global climate change and I’m also interested in the demographic processes that drive such shifts. Much of my work focusses on birds and I collaborate with conservation organisations to ensure that a variety of additional interests tackle problems of practical significance.

Prof Colin Brown

Prof Colin Brown

The University of York

Current research focuses on integrated catchment management, working within the Water Friendly Farming platform to design and test interventions that deliver co-benefits for downstream flood risk, sediment delivery to water, as well as water quality (nutrients, pesticides) and aquatic biodiversity. Colin has advised UK Government through membership of the Advisory Committee on Pesticides and chairing its Environmental Panel. He has chaired a European working group on Environmental Risk Assessment, and the BioResources Group of the Society of Chemical Industry. He Chairs the conference on Pesticide Behaviour in Soils, Water and Air held every four years in York. Colin is Associate Dean (Research) within the Faculty of Sciences (2015-2019).

Dr Colin McClean

Dr Colin McClean

The University of York

General research interests involve the application of spatial analysis and GIS to environmental management. Research efforts in geography, the environmental sciences, ecology and environmental economics are strongly linked by the spatial distributions of the phenomena they seek to study. Many working in the field of GIS aim to develop new manipulation and analysis tools, however, the potential applications of relatively simple GIS analysis, in all of the above areas of study, has only begun to be explored. The major limitation to the exploitation of the tools that have been developed has been the paucity and quality of existing spatial data sets. These datasets are increasingly available, providing opportunities to consider environmental problems at the landscape, regional and global scales, where before only field-level studies might have been possible.

Dr Darrel Swift

The University of Sheffield

Glacial erosion and long-term landscape evolution
Glacial sediment systems and landform evolution processes
Luminescence as a process tracer in glacial sediment systems
Glacier hydrology and fluvioglacial sediment systems

Dr Dylan Childs

Dr Dylan Childs

The University of Sheffield

Life history theory – Characterising optimal reproductive strategies and components of selection in free-living populations.
Evolutionary demography – Application of evolutionary game theory (aka adaptive dynamics) to long-term demographic datasets.
Structured population modelling – Construction / parameterisation of accurate demographic models (e.g. integral projection models).
Host-parasite dynamics – Exploring the impact of environmental variation on dynamics (e.g. seasonal forcing in malaria)

Prof David Beerling

Prof David Beerling

The University of Sheffield

My interdisciplinary research group focuses on fundamental questions concerning how photosynthetic terrestrial ecosystems and the global environment co-evolved over the last half billion years. Our approach integrates evidence from fossils, experiments with terrestrial organisms, and rigorous theoretical models applied across spatial scales. We focus particularly on key processes and interactions important for revealing insights into the conquest of the land by plants, and the role of terrestrial ecosystems in shaping global ecology, climate and atmospheric composition. Our research findings also inform understanding of current anthropogenic climate change issues facing humanity.

Dr Donatella Zona

Dr Donatella Zona

The University of Sheffield

My main research emphasizes the impact of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and greenhouse gas emission (CO2 and CH4) in the Arctic.
My interest ranges from the mechanisms allowing tundra ecosystems to adjust or avoid environmental stress and how climate change affects ecosystem functioning to the importance and the challenges of integrating different scales and approaches to understanding the patterns and controls on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic.

Dr David Edwards

Dr David Edwards

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on understanding the impacts of land-use change on tropical biodiversity. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of managing tropical landscapes for biodiversity protection and the mechanisms that can be used to fund protection, although I have a range of interests, including:
Impacts of logging management on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning;
Tropical agriculture and sustainability;
The interaction between climate change and land-use change on extinction risk;
Cost-effective conservation within the tropics;
Policy drivers of tropical forest protection, including REDD+ and sustainability labeling;
Mechanisms of maintenance in mutualism;

Dr David Atkinson

Dr David Atkinson

The University of Liverpool

My passion is ecological and biological synthesis that brings new understanding of impacts of climatic and other environmental perturbation on organisms and ecosystems.Our investigations focus particularly on the fundamental impacts of temperature, body size and resource flux on rates of biological processes at levels of organization ranging from individuals to ecosystems. These biological processes include individual resource uptake, growth, development, population growth, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. We work at the interface of ecology, evolution and physiology, and our approaches include advancing new theory, including a novel metabolic scaling theory; performing experiments on whole pond ecosystems and populations; and carrying out meta-analyses to quantify global trends.

Dr Daniel Chapman

Dr Daniel Chapman

I lead projects modelling the dispersal, spread and impacts of non-native invasive plants and pest organisms. These models are important in understanding the biological processes driving invasion and for planning effective control strategies.
Major science questions include:

Are large-scale patterns of invasion constrained by species dispersal, global transport networks and climate?
What are the best ways to conduct surveillance and control of invasive species?
What is the role of trait adaptation in promoting invasion?
How do invasive non-native species integrate into ecological networks?

Prof Douglas Yu

Prof Douglas Yu

We study cooperation in two of its manifestations:
Conservation (cooperation between humans and nature) and
Mutualisms (cooperation between species).
See my personal webpage for more detail: www.douglasyu.org/research/

Dr David Rippin

Dr David Rippin

The University of York

My research interests are focussed on the controls on the dynamics of glaciers and ice-sheets, and the use of ground-based and airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) techniques in exploring englacial and subglacial environments. I also work on the thermal evolution of small Arctic glaciers, and is increasingly interested in supraglacial environments, and devising approaches for monitoring change in these locations.

Dr Elva Robinson

Dr Elva Robinson

I am a lecturer at the University of York, working on social behaviour. Social structure in animal groups affects how robust a population is to stresses such as disease, disturbance by humans, or habitat fragmentation. Effects of environmental change on animal social structure are challenging to study but have wide reaching implications for conservation and management. My research uses fieldwork, laboratory experiments and theoretical modelling. I use ants as a model system which can be manipulated at both the individual and group levels, allowing thorough exploration of the rules governing social behaviour and interaction with the environment.

Dr Francis Daunt

Dr Francis Daunt

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
My main interests lie in understanding the drivers of change in seabird populations. North Sea seabirds have shown recent population declines, and my research aims to understand the effects of climate change, disease, fisheries and marine energy developments. My approach is to gain a detailed understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of individual behaviour and physiology that determine demographic parameters.

Dr Gareth Fraser

Dr Gareth Fraser

The University of Sheffield

Evolution and development of jaws and teeth
Evolutionary history of vertebrate innovations
Genetic basis of morphological diversity
My research is focused on the evolution and development of morphological diversity in fishes. I am interested in a range of evo-devo models from cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi to the catshark. I investigate a range of themes (i) how genetic networks maintain the continuous production of teeth, (ii) genetic mechanisms affecting dental diversity, (iii) the evolution and development of the pharyngeal/branchial arches, and (iv) the evolution of sensory elaborations in early vertebrates

Dr Gareth Phoenix

Dr Gareth Phoenix

The University of Sheffield

In the Phoenix lab we study the interactions between plants and the environment, particularly in Arctic, northern boreal and upland ecosystems.

Our research includes the impacts of climate change (warming, extreme events, snow regime change, precipitation), UV-B radiation and pollution on ecosystem structure and function. We study the impacts on biodiversity, on cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and the consequences for feedback to climate (ecosystem carbon balance). We also aim to understand how responses observed at the vegetation/ecosystem level are driven by individual plant, root and leaf responses.

Dr Garry Hayman

Dr Garry Hayman

Garry’s current research interests cover terrestrial biosphere and land-atmosphere interactions and the use of Earth Observation data for model evaluation. He is currently involved in a number of projects concerning methane emissions from boreal and African wetlands (NERC African Wetlands and NERC Methane and other Greenhouse Gases in the Arctic – measurements, process studies and modelling), which use surface and satellite atmospheric methane measurements to assess the methane wetland emission parameterisation in the JULES land surface model (https://jules.jchmr.org/).

Dr Gavin Thomas

Dr Gavin Thomas

The University of Sheffield

Phylogeny, diversification and trait evolution
My research focuses on modelling the diversification of species and traits at a macroevolutionary scale. I am particularly interested in how we can use information on the phylogenetic relationships among species to infer how present-day biodiversity has arisen over time and ask:

How and why do lineages and traits diversify?
What are the consequences of varying tempo and mode of lineage and trait evolution for temporal and spatial patterns of diversity?
My lab is currently preoccupied with collecting a large database of bill shapes and plumage colours from all extant bird species (~10,000 species) using museum study skins (mainly the NHM at Tring and also the University of Manchester Museum).
You can get involved with this ERC-funded project with our Bird bill citizen science website: markmybird.org.

Prof Greg Hurst

Prof Greg Hurst

The University of Liverpool

Many insects carry microbes that distort their host sex ratio, favouring the production and survival of female hosts. I work to establish:
a) How these microbes change the ecology of their host, in terms of mating system and the spread of sexually transmitted infections.
b) How they drive the evolution of their host, for instance, the evolution of sex-determining systems.
This work uses butterflies, ladybird, Drosophila and Nasonia jewel wasp as model systems in the field and the laboratory.

Prof Grant Bigg

Prof Grant Bigg

The University of Sheffield

The common theme of all my research until recently has been marine climate change. However, many threads contribute to this theme. A major thread is the use, and development, of ocean circulation models to understand climate change on scales from global and millennial to local and sub-monthly. I use a combination of models and remote sensing, with interpreting oceanographic and lower atmospheric data, to increase our understanding of the climatic interaction between the atmosphere and ocean. I use iceberg trajectories to study glacial freshwater inputs to modern and Quaternary oceans. My primary focus of recent years can be divided into the global thermohaline circulation, icebergs and tropical climate change. More recently, however, there has begun to be an increased emphasis on the role environmental change plays in society.
Global thermohaline circulation
Icebergs
Tropical climate change

Dr Ilik Saccheri

The University of Liverpool

My early interest was on the impact of genetic factors on components of fitness and extinction risk in small populations (conservation genetics), and I continue to study the genetic basis of inbreeding depression using butterflies and moths as model systems. The other main thread to my research aims to understand the genetic architecture of rapid adaptation, primarily through reconstructing the evolutionary origins and dynamics of industrial melanism in moths, but also in other contexts.

Prof Jon Slate

Prof Jon Slate

The University of Sheffield

Genetic architecture and evolution of fitness traits in wild populations
Genome mapping
Inbreeding & inbreeding depression

Dr Jack Thomson

Dr Jack Thomson

The University of Liverpool

Most of my work focuses on behavioural ecology, examining intraspecific variation in personality amongst a variety of organisms. Currently my main interests are in aggression and boldness, particularly in fish and in crustaceans.

Dr James Chong

Dr James Chong

The University of York

Molecular biologist with an interest in (anaerobic) microbial communities. My group utilises a range of ‘omics methods to chart dynamic changes.

Dr Jamie Wood

Dr Jamie Wood

The University of York

My current research interests are in the field of complexity and emergent phenomena in biologically inspired models. This is primarily focused on understanding how we may use both computational and analytic techniques in statistical mechanics to further our knowledge of the stability and robustness of natural systems. This is a broad area, and my current work includes: extending models based on James Lovelock’s Daisyworld parable including looking for links to established theories in quantitative genetics; investigating flocking or herding behaviour in animals, and how these systems can be related to models of network rewiring; developing primitive models of quorum sensing in bacteria, especially understanding spatial effects and how this may lead to biofilm formation.

Prof Jane Hill

Prof Jane Hill

The University of York

Jane’s research group studies the impacts of climate change and habitat loss on species, with fieldwork in Britain and Borneo. Jane’s Ph.D. examined migration in UK moths and her research has mainly focused on the environmental factors affecting population dynamics of butterflies and moths since then. After post-doc research in Birmingham, Leeds, and Durham Universities, Jane joined the University of York in 2001 and became Professor of Ecology in 2010. Current research projects are studying climate-driven range shifts of species at their leading-edge (i.e patterns of colonisation and range expansion) and trailing-edge range boundaries (i.e. local extinction rates), and the factors affecting species’ ability to respond to climate and habitat changes (including investigating evidence for evolutionary adaptation to climate). We are exploring potential methods for promoting adaptation of biodiversity to climate warming, for example by examining whether or not improving habitat connectivity will aid species’ range shifts and the role of Protected Areas. We are also exploring issues around the environmental sustainability of oil palm cultivation and testing certification standards.
Jane is a trustee of the SE Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, a trustee and member of Council of the British Ecological Society, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society. She received a Marsh/ZSL Award for Conservation Biology in 2011. Jane is involved in promoting women in science and led the York Biology Department to an Athena SWAN Gold Award in 2014.

Prof Jane Hurst

Prof Jane Hurst

The University of Liverpool

My main interests are in the functions, mechanisms and evolution of scent communication in mammals, animal welfare (particularly in relation to laboratory animals), rodent pest control, and the interactions between behaviour and disease.

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

The University of York

My group’s research is focused on the structural analysis of biologically-active molecules in order to understand better their mechanism of action at the molecular level. Our primary technique is mass spectrometry, which we use in conjunction with a wide variety of other analytical techniques, including chemical, enzymatic and separations strategies, principally for application in proteomic and metabolomic studies. The group’s research has an emphasis on pursuing long-term, integrated studies of biological systems, which means that multidisciplinary collaborations are of prime importance; we are very fortunate in having a range of ongoing projects with a set of long-term and expert collaborators.

Dr Jenny Hodgson

Dr Jenny Hodgson

The University of Liverpool

I am a conservation biologist. I research how the spatial arrangement of land use and management affects the viability of species, and how climate change interacts with land use. I use a mixture of empirical and modelling approaches.

I serve as Early Career Researcher representative on the ACCE management board and I hope to represent the views of ECR supervisors in general. If you are an ECR and potential supervisor at any ACCE institution, please email me to be added to my mailing list.

Dr Jon Pitchford

No biographical info given.

Dr Jon Green

Dr Jon Green

The University of Liverpool

My research interests lie at the interface of the traditional disciplines of ecology, physiology and behaviour. My work focuses on seabirds, as these animals must adapt be adapted to two contrasting environments: the challenges of foraging in a big, deep, cold, dark, distant water body are very different to those that they face while breeding and moulting on land. Furthermore, both of these environments and their associated challenges change naturally on a seasonal and annual basis and are under anthropogenic threats from over-fishing, climate change and renewable energy developments.

Prof Jonathan Sharples

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Blanchard

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Ferrari

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Dr Karl Bates

The University of Liverpool

My research concentrates on the functional anatomy of terrestrial vertebrates, with particular focus on the locomotor system. My goal is to understand the links between morphology and limb biomechanics in order
 to better characterize how animals achieve their full range of habitual motions. This has led
 me to study a range of living tetrapods from primates to archosaurs in order to further our understanding of major evolutionary transitions in locomotor biomechanics.

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

The University of York

Research centres on understanding the process of speciation in heliconiine and ithomiine butterflies. Both groups of butterflies are found in the neotropics and are noted for the diversity of wing colour patterns found within species, as well as also for mimetic convergence of colour patterns between species (Müllarian mimicry).

Making use of the Heliconius melpomene reference genome, the current focus involves using high-throughput sequencing approaches to understand the speciation process at the scale of the genome. In particular we are investigating genome-wide patterns of divergence, adaptive introgression, and quantifying the amount of genomic exchange between species.

Dr Karl Evans

No biographical info given.

Dr Kate Parr

Dr Kate Parr

The University of Liverpool

I am a community ecologist with a particular interest in understanding how tropical grassy systems are structured, how they function and the best way to conserve them. Much of my work, and that of my research group, focuses on invertebrates – particularly social insects.

Dr Kathryn Arnold

Dr Kathryn Arnold

The University of York

Ecologist, working mainly on the behavioural and physiological responses of vertebrates to changes in the environment. My current research falls mainly into two areas: 1) the assessment of exposure to and effects of contaminants on wildlife and 2) the ecology of rural and urban birds. However, I also maintain an interest in the social behaviour of birds, insects, fish and manta rays.

Dr Kelly Redeker

No biographical info given.

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

The University of Liverpool

My overarching research interest is how animals (and primarily humans) move. That is very general, so in my work I focus on musculo-skeletal biomechanics, with evolutionary aspects always (at least) in the back of my mind.
I am particulary interested in the biomechanics of the healthy human shod and unshod foot.

Dr Lisa Emberson

No biographical info given.

Prof Lorraine Maltby

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Bateman

Prof Mark Bateman

The University of Sheffield

My high profile collaborative research focuses on past aeolian landscapes as an archive for better understanding past depositional processes and environmental changes. Three themes are centred around this:
– As aeolian deposits, both arid zone and cold-climate, are widespread in the Quaternary sedimentary record they can provide key data for understanding previous palaeoenvironmental conditions and inform the archaeological record;
– Novel applications of luminescence dating has allowed a better understanding of the integrity of preserved sandy sediments;
– Research is also currently trying to extend the application of luminescence dating to glacial and ice marginal sediments.

Dr Mirre Simons

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Hodson

No biographical info given.

Prof Mike Begon

Prof Mike Begon

The University of Liverpool

The ecology of infectious diseases in wildlife populations, especially diseases transmisible to humans, both within the UK and worldwide (e.g. leptospirosis in Brazilian favelas and bubonic plague in Central Asia).

Prof Michael Brockhurst

Prof Michael Brockhurst

The University of York

Rapid contemporary evolution can have important applied consequences, and particularly so in microbes, whose short generation times and large populations potentiate high evolutionary rates. My lab employs a diversity of study systems and a broad range of approaches including laboratory experimental evolution, surveys of natural communities, analysis of clinical samples, next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modelling to address both pure and applied research questions in coevolution, diversification and adaptation.

Dr Nigel Dunnett

No biographical info given.

Dr Nicola Nadeau

Dr Nicola Nadeau

The University of Sheffield

The evolution and genetics of colour pattern variation
The genetic and developmental control of structural colours in animals
The process of divergence and speciation within the genome
The genetic analysis of natural hybrid zones to identify loci under selection.
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of adaptive evolution, speciation and sexual selection in natural populations. The major focus of my current research is the evolution and genetics of convergent iridescent structural colour in Heliconius butterflies.

Dr. Nick Isaac

No biographical info given.

Dr Nathan Jeffery

No biographical info given.

Dr. Niall McNamara

No biographical info given.

Dr Oliver Craig

Dr Oliver Craig

The University of York

Specialises in biomolecular archaeology, i.e. the recovery of proteins, lipids and DNA from ancient skeletal remains and archaeological artefacts to provide insights into past human activities.
His particular interests lie in temporal transitions and variability in human diets, cuisine and subsistence practices and the impact that dietary changes had on social evolution, health and the environment.
Oliver is interested in combining a broad range of analytical techniques to study palaeodiet but particularly stable isotope analysis of human bone and organic residue analysis of food remains on ceramics.His research has focused on the analysis of materials from key prehistoric sites in Central and Eastern Europe and along the North East Atlantic, Baltic and Mediterranean coastlines.

Prof Owen Petchey

No biographical info given.

Prof Paul Blackwell

Prof Paul Blackwell

The University of Sheffield

I mainly work in Bayesian statistics; I am interested in the development of new models and methodology, particularly inference for random processes, driven by real applications which are primarily in ecology but also in environmental science, archaeology and other areas. I am also interested in stochastic modelling, statistics and simulation more generally, again often with ecological and environmental applications.

Prof Paula Stockley

Prof Paula Stockley

The University of Liverpool

My research aims to explain diversity in animal reproductive traits, with emphasis on mechanisms and evolutionary consequences of sperm competition and sexual selection, particularly in mammals. I also have broad interests in the fields of behavioural and evolutionary ecology relating to reproductive strategies, life history evolution and social behaviour. Current projects include experimental and comparative studies of ejaculate expenditure, copulatory behaviour, genital evolution, male mate choice and female competition. Multidisciplinary collaborations apply molecular and proteomics techniques to address evolutionary questions within these areas.

Prof Philip H Warren

No biographical info given.

Dr Penny Spikins

No biographical info given.

Dr Peter Mayhew

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Prof J Peter W Young

No biographical info given.

Prof Piran White

No biographical info given.

Prof Rob Freckleton

Prof Rob Freckleton

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on modelling population and community dynamics. I am particularly interested in large scale population dynamics, although have a range of interests, including:
Plant population ecology, modelling plant populations, modelling weed populations.
Evolutionary ecology, phylogenetic comparative methodology and its application to ecological problems.
Theoretical ecology, statistical methodology.

Dr Rob Bryant

No biographical info given.

Dr Bob Johnston

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on the environmental histories of landscapes in the UK, with a specific interest in the uplands and the coastal fringe of northwest Wales. I am working with PhD students on late Holocene sea level change in north Cardigan Bay and the impacts of future climate change on estuarine landscapes of SW Snowdonia.

Prof Roger Butlin

Prof Roger Butlin

The University of Sheffield

My research is concerned primarily with the origin of barriers to gene exchange, especially the evolutionary genetics of reproductive isolation. I have used insect acoustic and chemical signals as model systems to investigate the controversial process of reinforcement, particularly in parapatry, and questions such as the inheritance of signal characters and the form of female preferences. I am currently working with hybrid zones in grasshoppers of the genus Chorthippus, and collaborating in projects on speciation in winkles (Littorina), and signal and response evolution in the Drosophila virilis group. Another area of research concerns the evolution of asexual reproduction using ostracods as models. I am interested in evolution at range margins and its implications for conservation genetics. Current projects use Arabidopsis lyrata and other models. I collaborate in studies of population structure and sexual segregation in bats, behaviour of zebrafish, ecology and evolution of mosquitoes and beetle phylogeography.

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

The University of Sheffield

NERC IRF at the Department of Animal & Plant Science of the University of Sheffield. He joined the faculty in 2016 as an NERC IRF. His research group (@SalGoTeam) focuses on understanding the mechanisms that constrain and diversify life history traits and life history strategies in animals and plants. His work uses a combination of approaches that include functional ecology, population ecology, comparative biology and formal demography.

2002: BSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz, Spain
2004: MSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz & Kingston Univ, UK
2011: Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity, Univ Pennsylvania, USA

Dr Rhonda Snook

Dr Rhonda Snook

The University of Sheffield

Reproduction and development define life and therefore are fundamental to understanding the evolution of biodiversity. My primary research interest is the evolution of reproductive strategies, focussing on gamete evolution, fertilisation, sexual selection, and speciation. I have addressed these areas using Drosophila fruit flies as model systems. My lab uses a variety of different approaches to study reproductive strategies, including population and quantitative genetics, experimental evolution, and recently next generation sequencing, at both a population and landscape scales. Current projects include the evolution of postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation and how climate change may impact reproduction.

Prof Richard Shore

No biographical info given.

Prof Roland Gehrels

Prof Roland Gehrels

The University of York

I grew up in the Netherlands where I studied Quaternary Geology at the Free University in Amsterdam. I completed a PhD at the University of Maine in Geology in 1994 and continued my academic career as a sea-level scientist, first as a postdoc at Durham University, and then for 18 years at Plymouth University. In 2013 I accepted a Chair in Physical Geography at the University of York. In the past decade my research efforts have focussed primarily on the coupling of geological field evidence with tide-gauge observations to reconstruct historical sea-level changes using proxy methods. My main achievement is the reconstruction of the acceleration of sea-level rise during the first decades of the 20th century in sites around the North Atlantic and the Southwest Pacific. This work has led to the realisation that recent rapid sea-level changes occur on a global scale and are linked to global warming. In recent years my research has taken on a new societal dimension with relevance for sea-level predictions. An example of this is my involvement in the iGlass project (http://www.highstand.org/iglass) which represents an attempt to apply the sea-level reconstruction methods developed for Holocene intertidal sediments to earlier interglacial sequences, with direct implications for understanding the dynamics of ice sheets.

Prof Steven Banwart

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Livingstone

Dr Stephen Livingstone

My research interests are in reconstructing ice sheets and their dynamics from geological and geophysical evidence in both marine and terrestrial environments. They can be summarised as follows:

1. Investigating the drainage and storage of meltwater at the bed of (palaeo-)ice sheets.
2. The identification and investigation of landform-sediment assemblages and physical processes at the bed of palaeo-ice streams, and the controls governing their retreat.
4. Reconstructing the Late Quaternary history and dynamics of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet.

Prof Steve Paterson

No biographical info given.

Dr Seth Barribeau

No biographical info given.

Dr Samantha Patrick

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Cornell

Dr Stephen Cornell

The University of Liverpool

Member of the evolutionary ecology research group seek to understand ecological and evolutionary patterns in nature, and to understand the feedback between ecology and evolution. Our work is diverse in terms of the organisms we study, the questions we investigate, and the approaches we use.

Prof. Terry Burke

No biographical info given.

Dr Tom Webb

Dr Tom Webb

The University of Sheffield

My primary research interest is in the macroecology of marine ecosystems. In particular, I am interested in how and why marine biodiversity is unevenly distributed in space and time. This interest has led me into the realm of biodiversity informatics – using large databases of different facets of marine diversity in order to synthesise the state of knowledge of the world’s oceans. My research is currently focused on three major areas:
Global patterns and trends in marine biodiversity – interrogating, linking, and extracting trends from major biodiversity databases using novel statistical methods
Comparative analysis of marine and terrestrial ecosystems – to what extent does ecological theory generalise across realms?
Dynamics of UK marine systems – integrating data and models to understand the provision of ecosystem services from UK seas.

Dr Thomas Price

Dr Thomas Price

The University of Liverpool

My main focus is selfish genetic elements and the ways that conflicts within the genome of individuals impact on the development and behaviour of individuals, the survival of populations, and in changing species at the landscape scale. In particular, I work on meiotic drive- selfish X chromosomes that spread by killing Y chromosome sperm, causing all female broods and distorting the sex ratios of whole populations. I try to understand the mechanisms that underly these drivers, and their ecological and evolutionary impacts on sex, speciation and survival.

A second theme is why some females choose to mate with only one male in their life, while others may mate with dozens a day.

More broadly, I also work on sexual cannibalism in mantids and spiders with my ACCE student, Adam Fisher. I also collaborate with ACCE student Chloe Heys on trying to understand why parrots masturbate so much.

Dr Virpi Lummaa

No biographical info given.

Dr Ville Friman

No biographical info given.

Prof George Wolff

No biographical info given.

Dr Zen Lewis

No biographical info given.

Dr Andrew Beckerman

Dr Andrew Beckerman

The University of Sheffield

Evolutionary Ecologist and Conservation Biologist working at the interface of Genes, Populations, Food Webs…. and Parrots

Aquatic Communities
• Algae and Daphnia Defences, Predator Induced Phenotypic Plasticity
Food Webs
• Foraging Biology and the Structure and Complexity of Communities
Parrots
•Conservation and Demography of Amazon Parrots with the World Parrot Trust

Dr Alison Wright

Dr Alison Wright

The University of Sheffield

Males and females of many species across the animal kingdom often look and behave very differently. However, the two sexes share an almost identical set of genes. So, how do these remarkable sex differences arise?

Sex chromosomes are the only region of the genome to differ between females and males, and are, therefore, predicted to play key roles in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. My research is centered on understanding the genomic and evolutionary processes underlying sex differences. In particular, I am interested in:

• the origins and turnover of sex chromosome systems
• sex chromosome degeneration
• role of the sex chromosomes in sexual dimorphism
• evolution of gene expression and dosage compensation
• genome evolution and sexual selection.

Prof Andy Fenton

Prof Andy Fenton

The University of Liverpool

I am interested in understanding the occurrence and consequences of interactions between species in natural communities – with a particular focus on infectious diseases. My work focuses on the use of simple mathematical theory, coupled with experimental perturbations of natural systems, to reveal the extent to which species interact, and whether those interactions are important for the dynamics of each species, or the stability of the community as a whole.
In terms of infectious diseases, I am particularly interested in whether co-circulating and co-infecting parasite species interact inside hosts, and whether those interactions affect the host’s susceptibility to infection or disease by other parasites. I am also interested in how multiple host species combine to determine the transmission and persistence of parasites at the host community level.

Prof Andrew Hodson

Prof Andrew Hodson

The University of Sheffield

Andy’s research largely takes places in the Arctic and Antarctica. Since climate warming signals can be so strong here, he considers the implications of ground thaw and glacier melt for the sensitive ecosystems that are often found at or near the ice margin. He also looks at the microbial ecosystems within the ice itself, since there are fewer habitats more vulnerable to the impacts of climate warming than ice and snow.

In the Arctic, Andy is currently leading a large European project funded via several national research councils (the Joint Programming Initiative). The emphasis of this project called “LowPerm” is the biogeochemical feedbacks associated with lowland permafrost thaw in the High Arctic. A video about the work that inspired this project can be seen here. http://lowperm.group.shef.ac.uk/

Dr Ann Rowan

Dr Ann Rowan

The University of Sheffield

Ann is a Research Fellow in Geography. Her research interests include:
The response of mountain glaciers to climate change
Geomorphology and dynamics of debris-covered glaciers
Glacier and hydrological change in the Himalaya

Dr Alistair Derby

Dr Alistair Derby

The University of Liverpool

Bioinformatics and Modelling
Evolutionary Ecology
Ecology, Evolution and Genomics of Infectious Disease
Microbiology

Dr Amy Pedersen

My research focuses on the importance of multi-host parasites and in particular on the factors that drive disease emergence. Much research in disease ecology and evolution focuses on the one host–one parasite framework. And yet, in natural systems, hosts are usually co-infected by multiple parasites, and many parasites can infect several host species. I focus on understanding host-parasite interactions in this realistic context. My past and current work have sought to significantly expand this perspective by (i) evaluating the interactions that occur between co-infecting parasites and their implications for host health and (ii) to advance our knowledge of how multi-host parasites contribute to disease emergence.

Dr Anu Thompson

No biographical info given.

Prof Ben Hatchwell

Prof Ben Hatchwell

The University of Sheffield

My principal research interest is in social evolution and reproductive strategies. The main approach of my research is to use field observations and experiments to test evolutionary theory.
Specific research interests and achievements include:
The ecological factors that promote the evolution of animal societies.
The influence of individual dispersal decisions on the genetic structure of populations and the consequences for cooperative behaviour.
The alternative reproductive strategies of individuals in cooperative groups and their fitness consequences.
Mechanisms of kin recognition in social animals.
Proximate and ultimate causes of variation in parental investment.
I am also interested in avian population ecology, including long-term studies of seabirds and the ecology of urban bird populations.

Dr Ben Woodcock

Dr Ben Woodcock

Ben Woodcock is an Ecological Entomologist in the Community Ecology Group at CEH Wallingford. He is involved in research that develops applied management solutions to enhancing ecosystems service delivery and biodiversity within arable and grassland ecosystems. This has focused principally on the development of agri-environment schemes, which are the main policy mechanism for changing the management of UK farming systems. His research has included projects for both the UK government (e.g. Defra and Natural England) and private sector (Syngenta).

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

The University of Liverpool

My current research interests centre on three areas: (i) sexual conflicts and the operation of sexual selection, (ii) the evolution and function of animal communication systems, and (iii) the optimization of conservation efforts. I investigate these topics taking theoretical as well as empirical approaches, primarily using ungulate study systems. My main field site is in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, where I have been running the Mara Antelope Research Project since 1998. I am a member of the IUCN Antelope Specialist Group (since 1994).

Prof Carlos Peres

Prof Carlos Peres

Large-scale patterns of large-bodied vertebrate diversity and abundance in Amazonian forests; effects of different forms on human disturbance, including hunting, habitat fragmentation, wildfires, natural regeneration, and fast-growing tree plantations on Amazonian biodiversity; population ecology and management of natural resources in tropical forests; reserve selection and design criteria in relation to regional gradients of biodiversity value and implementation costs.

Prof Charles Wellman

Prof Charles Wellman

The University of Sheffield

My research addresses the highly topical and controversial problem of the origin and early evolution of land plants. My research integrates evidence from both fossil and living plants. Fossil evidence is in the form of early land plant megafossils and dispersed microfossils—spores and fragments. I am currently working on material from China, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Kazakhstan and Spitsbergen. I study living plants in order to interpret the earliest land plant fossils [specifically through: (i) cladistic analyses of evolutionary relationships; (ii) molecular clock analyses of evolutionary divergence times; (iii) analysis of physiological adaptations required for plants to invade the land (particularly Evo-Devo studies on the molecular genetics of spore/pollen wall development)]. I am also exploring the impact of the invasion of the land by plants on global change. This has led to research into developing a novel (and currently only) proxy for past UV-B radiation. In recent years I have also extended my research back in time to examine a previously neglected research area considering the ‘algal scum’ that inhabited the land before it was invaded by plants.

Prof Chris Evans

Prof Chris Evans

Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem biogeochemistry, with a focus on semi-natural and managed uplands and peatlands. Interests include:
Trends and drivers of change in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems.
Field-scale measurement of fluxes and controls on the carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of natural, managed and restored peatlands in temperate and tropical regions, and the potential role of restoration and mitigation measures in reducing GHG emissions.
Sources, processing and fate of terrestrially-derived organic matter in aquatic ecosystems, from headwater streams and lakes to estuaries and coastal waters, and the contribution of this flux to anthropogenic GHG emissions
Controls on the cycling of atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur in terrestrial ecosystems, including controls on leaching to surface waters, ecosystem nitrogen saturation, recovery from acidification, the role modifying land-use factors such as forestry, grazing and burning, and links on the carbon cycle.
Impacts of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, particularly in relation to water quality extremes and their ecological impacts.
Ecosystem-scale biogeochemical modelling of the impacts of atmospheric N and S deposition, ozone (O3), climate change and land-use on terrestrial productivity, C balance, soil and water chemistry and plant species diversity.
Synthesis of scientific understanding to take account of multiple anthropogenic drivers and ecosystem functions in support of the policy, particularly in relation to land-management.

Prof Chris Thomas

Prof Chris Thomas

The University of York

Chris and his research group are interested in understanding how humans have transformed the biological world, and how humans might protect the world’s remaining biodiversity. His research and scientific publications fall into three main areas:

Why and how species respond to climate change. Chris was the first to estimate how climate change might endanger biodiversity at a global scale. His research group has provided evidence that species move their geographic distributions as the climate changes (YouTube interview), and they are currently evaluating distribution changes and evolution in species that are responding to climate change.

Dr Colin Beale

Dr Colin Beale

The University of York

I work on a wide range of ecological problems from population dynamics and distributions to fire ecology in the African savannah. The main linking thread of my research is a fundamental interest in spatial processes in ecology, from the way individual animals move across a landscape, through the patterns and processes that shape individual species distributions, to global patterns in biodiversity. I’m interested in understanding all aspects of spatial variation in ecological processes at a range of spatial scales, using and developing appropriate statistical techniques alongside an active programme of field research in the UK and Africa. Currently, many species distributions are shifting as a consequence of global climate change and I’m also interested in the demographic processes that drive such shifts. Much of my work focusses on birds and I collaborate with conservation organisations to ensure that a variety of additional interests tackle problems of practical significance.

Prof Colin Brown

Prof Colin Brown

The University of York

Current research focuses on integrated catchment management, working within the Water Friendly Farming platform to design and test interventions that deliver co-benefits for downstream flood risk, sediment delivery to water, as well as water quality (nutrients, pesticides) and aquatic biodiversity. Colin has advised UK Government through membership of the Advisory Committee on Pesticides and chairing its Environmental Panel. He has chaired a European working group on Environmental Risk Assessment, and the BioResources Group of the Society of Chemical Industry. He Chairs the conference on Pesticide Behaviour in Soils, Water and Air held every four years in York. Colin is Associate Dean (Research) within the Faculty of Sciences (2015-2019).

Dr Colin McClean

Dr Colin McClean

The University of York

General research interests involve the application of spatial analysis and GIS to environmental management. Research efforts in geography, the environmental sciences, ecology and environmental economics are strongly linked by the spatial distributions of the phenomena they seek to study. Many working in the field of GIS aim to develop new manipulation and analysis tools, however, the potential applications of relatively simple GIS analysis, in all of the above areas of study, has only begun to be explored. The major limitation to the exploitation of the tools that have been developed has been the paucity and quality of existing spatial data sets. These datasets are increasingly available, providing opportunities to consider environmental problems at the landscape, regional and global scales, where before only field-level studies might have been possible.

Dr Darrel Swift

The University of Sheffield

Glacial erosion and long-term landscape evolution
Glacial sediment systems and landform evolution processes
Luminescence as a process tracer in glacial sediment systems
Glacier hydrology and fluvioglacial sediment systems

Dr Dylan Childs

Dr Dylan Childs

The University of Sheffield

Life history theory – Characterising optimal reproductive strategies and components of selection in free-living populations.
Evolutionary demography – Application of evolutionary game theory (aka adaptive dynamics) to long-term demographic datasets.
Structured population modelling – Construction / parameterisation of accurate demographic models (e.g. integral projection models).
Host-parasite dynamics – Exploring the impact of environmental variation on dynamics (e.g. seasonal forcing in malaria)

Prof David Beerling

Prof David Beerling

The University of Sheffield

My interdisciplinary research group focuses on fundamental questions concerning how photosynthetic terrestrial ecosystems and the global environment co-evolved over the last half billion years. Our approach integrates evidence from fossils, experiments with terrestrial organisms, and rigorous theoretical models applied across spatial scales. We focus particularly on key processes and interactions important for revealing insights into the conquest of the land by plants, and the role of terrestrial ecosystems in shaping global ecology, climate and atmospheric composition. Our research findings also inform understanding of current anthropogenic climate change issues facing humanity.

Dr Donatella Zona

Dr Donatella Zona

The University of Sheffield

My main research emphasizes the impact of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and greenhouse gas emission (CO2 and CH4) in the Arctic.
My interest ranges from the mechanisms allowing tundra ecosystems to adjust or avoid environmental stress and how climate change affects ecosystem functioning to the importance and the challenges of integrating different scales and approaches to understanding the patterns and controls on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic.

Dr David Edwards

Dr David Edwards

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on understanding the impacts of land-use change on tropical biodiversity. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of managing tropical landscapes for biodiversity protection and the mechanisms that can be used to fund protection, although I have a range of interests, including:
Impacts of logging management on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning;
Tropical agriculture and sustainability;
The interaction between climate change and land-use change on extinction risk;
Cost-effective conservation within the tropics;
Policy drivers of tropical forest protection, including REDD+ and sustainability labeling;
Mechanisms of maintenance in mutualism;

Dr David Atkinson

Dr David Atkinson

The University of Liverpool

My passion is ecological and biological synthesis that brings new understanding of impacts of climatic and other environmental perturbation on organisms and ecosystems.Our investigations focus particularly on the fundamental impacts of temperature, body size and resource flux on rates of biological processes at levels of organization ranging from individuals to ecosystems. These biological processes include individual resource uptake, growth, development, population growth, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. We work at the interface of ecology, evolution and physiology, and our approaches include advancing new theory, including a novel metabolic scaling theory; performing experiments on whole pond ecosystems and populations; and carrying out meta-analyses to quantify global trends.

Dr Daniel Chapman

Dr Daniel Chapman

I lead projects modelling the dispersal, spread and impacts of non-native invasive plants and pest organisms. These models are important in understanding the biological processes driving invasion and for planning effective control strategies.
Major science questions include:

Are large-scale patterns of invasion constrained by species dispersal, global transport networks and climate?
What are the best ways to conduct surveillance and control of invasive species?
What is the role of trait adaptation in promoting invasion?
How do invasive non-native species integrate into ecological networks?

Prof Douglas Yu

Prof Douglas Yu

We study cooperation in two of its manifestations:
Conservation (cooperation between humans and nature) and
Mutualisms (cooperation between species).
See my personal webpage for more detail: www.douglasyu.org/research/

Dr David Rippin

Dr David Rippin

The University of York

My research interests are focussed on the controls on the dynamics of glaciers and ice-sheets, and the use of ground-based and airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) techniques in exploring englacial and subglacial environments. I also work on the thermal evolution of small Arctic glaciers, and is increasingly interested in supraglacial environments, and devising approaches for monitoring change in these locations.

Dr Elva Robinson

Dr Elva Robinson

I am a lecturer at the University of York, working on social behaviour. Social structure in animal groups affects how robust a population is to stresses such as disease, disturbance by humans, or habitat fragmentation. Effects of environmental change on animal social structure are challenging to study but have wide reaching implications for conservation and management. My research uses fieldwork, laboratory experiments and theoretical modelling. I use ants as a model system which can be manipulated at both the individual and group levels, allowing thorough exploration of the rules governing social behaviour and interaction with the environment.

Dr Francis Daunt

Dr Francis Daunt

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
My main interests lie in understanding the drivers of change in seabird populations. North Sea seabirds have shown recent population declines, and my research aims to understand the effects of climate change, disease, fisheries and marine energy developments. My approach is to gain a detailed understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of individual behaviour and physiology that determine demographic parameters.

Dr Gareth Fraser

Dr Gareth Fraser

The University of Sheffield

Evolution and development of jaws and teeth
Evolutionary history of vertebrate innovations
Genetic basis of morphological diversity
My research is focused on the evolution and development of morphological diversity in fishes. I am interested in a range of evo-devo models from cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi to the catshark. I investigate a range of themes (i) how genetic networks maintain the continuous production of teeth, (ii) genetic mechanisms affecting dental diversity, (iii) the evolution and development of the pharyngeal/branchial arches, and (iv) the evolution of sensory elaborations in early vertebrates

Dr Gareth Phoenix

Dr Gareth Phoenix

The University of Sheffield

In the Phoenix lab we study the interactions between plants and the environment, particularly in Arctic, northern boreal and upland ecosystems.

Our research includes the impacts of climate change (warming, extreme events, snow regime change, precipitation), UV-B radiation and pollution on ecosystem structure and function. We study the impacts on biodiversity, on cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and the consequences for feedback to climate (ecosystem carbon balance). We also aim to understand how responses observed at the vegetation/ecosystem level are driven by individual plant, root and leaf responses.

Dr Garry Hayman

Dr Garry Hayman

Garry’s current research interests cover terrestrial biosphere and land-atmosphere interactions and the use of Earth Observation data for model evaluation. He is currently involved in a number of projects concerning methane emissions from boreal and African wetlands (NERC African Wetlands and NERC Methane and other Greenhouse Gases in the Arctic – measurements, process studies and modelling), which use surface and satellite atmospheric methane measurements to assess the methane wetland emission parameterisation in the JULES land surface model (https://jules.jchmr.org/).

Dr Gavin Thomas

Dr Gavin Thomas

The University of Sheffield

Phylogeny, diversification and trait evolution
My research focuses on modelling the diversification of species and traits at a macroevolutionary scale. I am particularly interested in how we can use information on the phylogenetic relationships among species to infer how present-day biodiversity has arisen over time and ask:

How and why do lineages and traits diversify?
What are the consequences of varying tempo and mode of lineage and trait evolution for temporal and spatial patterns of diversity?
My lab is currently preoccupied with collecting a large database of bill shapes and plumage colours from all extant bird species (~10,000 species) using museum study skins (mainly the NHM at Tring and also the University of Manchester Museum).
You can get involved with this ERC-funded project with our Bird bill citizen science website: markmybird.org.

Prof Greg Hurst

Prof Greg Hurst

The University of Liverpool

Many insects carry microbes that distort their host sex ratio, favouring the production and survival of female hosts. I work to establish:
a) How these microbes change the ecology of their host, in terms of mating system and the spread of sexually transmitted infections.
b) How they drive the evolution of their host, for instance, the evolution of sex-determining systems.
This work uses butterflies, ladybird, Drosophila and Nasonia jewel wasp as model systems in the field and the laboratory.

Prof Grant Bigg

Prof Grant Bigg

The University of Sheffield

The common theme of all my research until recently has been marine climate change. However, many threads contribute to this theme. A major thread is the use, and development, of ocean circulation models to understand climate change on scales from global and millennial to local and sub-monthly. I use a combination of models and remote sensing, with interpreting oceanographic and lower atmospheric data, to increase our understanding of the climatic interaction between the atmosphere and ocean. I use iceberg trajectories to study glacial freshwater inputs to modern and Quaternary oceans. My primary focus of recent years can be divided into the global thermohaline circulation, icebergs and tropical climate change. More recently, however, there has begun to be an increased emphasis on the role environmental change plays in society.
Global thermohaline circulation
Icebergs
Tropical climate change

Dr Ilik Saccheri

The University of Liverpool

My early interest was on the impact of genetic factors on components of fitness and extinction risk in small populations (conservation genetics), and I continue to study the genetic basis of inbreeding depression using butterflies and moths as model systems. The other main thread to my research aims to understand the genetic architecture of rapid adaptation, primarily through reconstructing the evolutionary origins and dynamics of industrial melanism in moths, but also in other contexts.

Prof Jon Slate

Prof Jon Slate

The University of Sheffield

Genetic architecture and evolution of fitness traits in wild populations
Genome mapping
Inbreeding & inbreeding depression

Dr Jack Thomson

Dr Jack Thomson

The University of Liverpool

Most of my work focuses on behavioural ecology, examining intraspecific variation in personality amongst a variety of organisms. Currently my main interests are in aggression and boldness, particularly in fish and in crustaceans.

Dr James Chong

Dr James Chong

The University of York

Molecular biologist with an interest in (anaerobic) microbial communities. My group utilises a range of ‘omics methods to chart dynamic changes.

Dr Jamie Wood

Dr Jamie Wood

The University of York

My current research interests are in the field of complexity and emergent phenomena in biologically inspired models. This is primarily focused on understanding how we may use both computational and analytic techniques in statistical mechanics to further our knowledge of the stability and robustness of natural systems. This is a broad area, and my current work includes: extending models based on James Lovelock’s Daisyworld parable including looking for links to established theories in quantitative genetics; investigating flocking or herding behaviour in animals, and how these systems can be related to models of network rewiring; developing primitive models of quorum sensing in bacteria, especially understanding spatial effects and how this may lead to biofilm formation.

Prof Jane Hill

Prof Jane Hill

The University of York

Jane’s research group studies the impacts of climate change and habitat loss on species, with fieldwork in Britain and Borneo. Jane’s Ph.D. examined migration in UK moths and her research has mainly focused on the environmental factors affecting population dynamics of butterflies and moths since then. After post-doc research in Birmingham, Leeds, and Durham Universities, Jane joined the University of York in 2001 and became Professor of Ecology in 2010. Current research projects are studying climate-driven range shifts of species at their leading-edge (i.e patterns of colonisation and range expansion) and trailing-edge range boundaries (i.e. local extinction rates), and the factors affecting species’ ability to respond to climate and habitat changes (including investigating evidence for evolutionary adaptation to climate). We are exploring potential methods for promoting adaptation of biodiversity to climate warming, for example by examining whether or not improving habitat connectivity will aid species’ range shifts and the role of Protected Areas. We are also exploring issues around the environmental sustainability of oil palm cultivation and testing certification standards.
Jane is a trustee of the SE Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, a trustee and member of Council of the British Ecological Society, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society. She received a Marsh/ZSL Award for Conservation Biology in 2011. Jane is involved in promoting women in science and led the York Biology Department to an Athena SWAN Gold Award in 2014.

Prof Jane Hurst

Prof Jane Hurst

The University of Liverpool

My main interests are in the functions, mechanisms and evolution of scent communication in mammals, animal welfare (particularly in relation to laboratory animals), rodent pest control, and the interactions between behaviour and disease.

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

The University of York

My group’s research is focused on the structural analysis of biologically-active molecules in order to understand better their mechanism of action at the molecular level. Our primary technique is mass spectrometry, which we use in conjunction with a wide variety of other analytical techniques, including chemical, enzymatic and separations strategies, principally for application in proteomic and metabolomic studies. The group’s research has an emphasis on pursuing long-term, integrated studies of biological systems, which means that multidisciplinary collaborations are of prime importance; we are very fortunate in having a range of ongoing projects with a set of long-term and expert collaborators.

Dr Jenny Hodgson

Dr Jenny Hodgson

The University of Liverpool

I am a conservation biologist. I research how the spatial arrangement of land use and management affects the viability of species, and how climate change interacts with land use. I use a mixture of empirical and modelling approaches.

I serve as Early Career Researcher representative on the ACCE management board and I hope to represent the views of ECR supervisors in general. If you are an ECR and potential supervisor at any ACCE institution, please email me to be added to my mailing list.

Dr Jon Pitchford

No biographical info given.

Dr Jon Green

Dr Jon Green

The University of Liverpool

My research interests lie at the interface of the traditional disciplines of ecology, physiology and behaviour. My work focuses on seabirds, as these animals must adapt be adapted to two contrasting environments: the challenges of foraging in a big, deep, cold, dark, distant water body are very different to those that they face while breeding and moulting on land. Furthermore, both of these environments and their associated challenges change naturally on a seasonal and annual basis and are under anthropogenic threats from over-fishing, climate change and renewable energy developments.

Prof Jonathan Sharples

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Blanchard

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Ferrari

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Dr Karl Bates

The University of Liverpool

My research concentrates on the functional anatomy of terrestrial vertebrates, with particular focus on the locomotor system. My goal is to understand the links between morphology and limb biomechanics in order
 to better characterize how animals achieve their full range of habitual motions. This has led
 me to study a range of living tetrapods from primates to archosaurs in order to further our understanding of major evolutionary transitions in locomotor biomechanics.

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

The University of York

Research centres on understanding the process of speciation in heliconiine and ithomiine butterflies. Both groups of butterflies are found in the neotropics and are noted for the diversity of wing colour patterns found within species, as well as also for mimetic convergence of colour patterns between species (Müllarian mimicry).

Making use of the Heliconius melpomene reference genome, the current focus involves using high-throughput sequencing approaches to understand the speciation process at the scale of the genome. In particular we are investigating genome-wide patterns of divergence, adaptive introgression, and quantifying the amount of genomic exchange between species.

Dr Karl Evans

No biographical info given.

Dr Kate Parr

Dr Kate Parr

The University of Liverpool

I am a community ecologist with a particular interest in understanding how tropical grassy systems are structured, how they function and the best way to conserve them. Much of my work, and that of my research group, focuses on invertebrates – particularly social insects.

Dr Kathryn Arnold

Dr Kathryn Arnold

The University of York

Ecologist, working mainly on the behavioural and physiological responses of vertebrates to changes in the environment. My current research falls mainly into two areas: 1) the assessment of exposure to and effects of contaminants on wildlife and 2) the ecology of rural and urban birds. However, I also maintain an interest in the social behaviour of birds, insects, fish and manta rays.

Dr Kelly Redeker

No biographical info given.

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

The University of Liverpool

My overarching research interest is how animals (and primarily humans) move. That is very general, so in my work I focus on musculo-skeletal biomechanics, with evolutionary aspects always (at least) in the back of my mind.
I am particulary interested in the biomechanics of the healthy human shod and unshod foot.

Dr Lisa Emberson

No biographical info given.

Prof Lorraine Maltby

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Bateman

Prof Mark Bateman

The University of Sheffield

My high profile collaborative research focuses on past aeolian landscapes as an archive for better understanding past depositional processes and environmental changes. Three themes are centred around this:
– As aeolian deposits, both arid zone and cold-climate, are widespread in the Quaternary sedimentary record they can provide key data for understanding previous palaeoenvironmental conditions and inform the archaeological record;
– Novel applications of luminescence dating has allowed a better understanding of the integrity of preserved sandy sediments;
– Research is also currently trying to extend the application of luminescence dating to glacial and ice marginal sediments.

Dr Mirre Simons

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Hodson

No biographical info given.

Prof Mike Begon

Prof Mike Begon

The University of Liverpool

The ecology of infectious diseases in wildlife populations, especially diseases transmisible to humans, both within the UK and worldwide (e.g. leptospirosis in Brazilian favelas and bubonic plague in Central Asia).

Prof Michael Brockhurst

Prof Michael Brockhurst

The University of York

Rapid contemporary evolution can have important applied consequences, and particularly so in microbes, whose short generation times and large populations potentiate high evolutionary rates. My lab employs a diversity of study systems and a broad range of approaches including laboratory experimental evolution, surveys of natural communities, analysis of clinical samples, next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modelling to address both pure and applied research questions in coevolution, diversification and adaptation.

Dr Nigel Dunnett

No biographical info given.

Dr Nicola Nadeau

Dr Nicola Nadeau

The University of Sheffield

The evolution and genetics of colour pattern variation
The genetic and developmental control of structural colours in animals
The process of divergence and speciation within the genome
The genetic analysis of natural hybrid zones to identify loci under selection.
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of adaptive evolution, speciation and sexual selection in natural populations. The major focus of my current research is the evolution and genetics of convergent iridescent structural colour in Heliconius butterflies.

Dr. Nick Isaac

No biographical info given.

Dr Nathan Jeffery

No biographical info given.

Dr. Niall McNamara

No biographical info given.

Dr Oliver Craig

Dr Oliver Craig

The University of York

Specialises in biomolecular archaeology, i.e. the recovery of proteins, lipids and DNA from ancient skeletal remains and archaeological artefacts to provide insights into past human activities.
His particular interests lie in temporal transitions and variability in human diets, cuisine and subsistence practices and the impact that dietary changes had on social evolution, health and the environment.
Oliver is interested in combining a broad range of analytical techniques to study palaeodiet but particularly stable isotope analysis of human bone and organic residue analysis of food remains on ceramics.His research has focused on the analysis of materials from key prehistoric sites in Central and Eastern Europe and along the North East Atlantic, Baltic and Mediterranean coastlines.

Prof Owen Petchey

No biographical info given.

Prof Paul Blackwell

Prof Paul Blackwell

The University of Sheffield

I mainly work in Bayesian statistics; I am interested in the development of new models and methodology, particularly inference for random processes, driven by real applications which are primarily in ecology but also in environmental science, archaeology and other areas. I am also interested in stochastic modelling, statistics and simulation more generally, again often with ecological and environmental applications.

Prof Paula Stockley

Prof Paula Stockley

The University of Liverpool

My research aims to explain diversity in animal reproductive traits, with emphasis on mechanisms and evolutionary consequences of sperm competition and sexual selection, particularly in mammals. I also have broad interests in the fields of behavioural and evolutionary ecology relating to reproductive strategies, life history evolution and social behaviour. Current projects include experimental and comparative studies of ejaculate expenditure, copulatory behaviour, genital evolution, male mate choice and female competition. Multidisciplinary collaborations apply molecular and proteomics techniques to address evolutionary questions within these areas.

Prof Philip H Warren

No biographical info given.

Dr Penny Spikins

No biographical info given.

Dr Peter Mayhew

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Prof J Peter W Young

No biographical info given.

Prof Piran White

No biographical info given.

Prof Rob Freckleton

Prof Rob Freckleton

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on modelling population and community dynamics. I am particularly interested in large scale population dynamics, although have a range of interests, including:
Plant population ecology, modelling plant populations, modelling weed populations.
Evolutionary ecology, phylogenetic comparative methodology and its application to ecological problems.
Theoretical ecology, statistical methodology.

Dr Rob Bryant

No biographical info given.

Dr Bob Johnston

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on the environmental histories of landscapes in the UK, with a specific interest in the uplands and the coastal fringe of northwest Wales. I am working with PhD students on late Holocene sea level change in north Cardigan Bay and the impacts of future climate change on estuarine landscapes of SW Snowdonia.

Prof Roger Butlin

Prof Roger Butlin

The University of Sheffield

My research is concerned primarily with the origin of barriers to gene exchange, especially the evolutionary genetics of reproductive isolation. I have used insect acoustic and chemical signals as model systems to investigate the controversial process of reinforcement, particularly in parapatry, and questions such as the inheritance of signal characters and the form of female preferences. I am currently working with hybrid zones in grasshoppers of the genus Chorthippus, and collaborating in projects on speciation in winkles (Littorina), and signal and response evolution in the Drosophila virilis group. Another area of research concerns the evolution of asexual reproduction using ostracods as models. I am interested in evolution at range margins and its implications for conservation genetics. Current projects use Arabidopsis lyrata and other models. I collaborate in studies of population structure and sexual segregation in bats, behaviour of zebrafish, ecology and evolution of mosquitoes and beetle phylogeography.

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

The University of Sheffield

NERC IRF at the Department of Animal & Plant Science of the University of Sheffield. He joined the faculty in 2016 as an NERC IRF. His research group (@SalGoTeam) focuses on understanding the mechanisms that constrain and diversify life history traits and life history strategies in animals and plants. His work uses a combination of approaches that include functional ecology, population ecology, comparative biology and formal demography.

2002: BSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz, Spain
2004: MSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz & Kingston Univ, UK
2011: Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity, Univ Pennsylvania, USA

Dr Rhonda Snook

Dr Rhonda Snook

The University of Sheffield

Reproduction and development define life and therefore are fundamental to understanding the evolution of biodiversity. My primary research interest is the evolution of reproductive strategies, focussing on gamete evolution, fertilisation, sexual selection, and speciation. I have addressed these areas using Drosophila fruit flies as model systems. My lab uses a variety of different approaches to study reproductive strategies, including population and quantitative genetics, experimental evolution, and recently next generation sequencing, at both a population and landscape scales. Current projects include the evolution of postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation and how climate change may impact reproduction.

Prof Richard Shore

No biographical info given.

Prof Roland Gehrels

Prof Roland Gehrels

The University of York

I grew up in the Netherlands where I studied Quaternary Geology at the Free University in Amsterdam. I completed a PhD at the University of Maine in Geology in 1994 and continued my academic career as a sea-level scientist, first as a postdoc at Durham University, and then for 18 years at Plymouth University. In 2013 I accepted a Chair in Physical Geography at the University of York. In the past decade my research efforts have focussed primarily on the coupling of geological field evidence with tide-gauge observations to reconstruct historical sea-level changes using proxy methods. My main achievement is the reconstruction of the acceleration of sea-level rise during the first decades of the 20th century in sites around the North Atlantic and the Southwest Pacific. This work has led to the realisation that recent rapid sea-level changes occur on a global scale and are linked to global warming. In recent years my research has taken on a new societal dimension with relevance for sea-level predictions. An example of this is my involvement in the iGlass project (http://www.highstand.org/iglass) which represents an attempt to apply the sea-level reconstruction methods developed for Holocene intertidal sediments to earlier interglacial sequences, with direct implications for understanding the dynamics of ice sheets.

Prof Steven Banwart

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Livingstone

Dr Stephen Livingstone

My research interests are in reconstructing ice sheets and their dynamics from geological and geophysical evidence in both marine and terrestrial environments. They can be summarised as follows:

1. Investigating the drainage and storage of meltwater at the bed of (palaeo-)ice sheets.
2. The identification and investigation of landform-sediment assemblages and physical processes at the bed of palaeo-ice streams, and the controls governing their retreat.
4. Reconstructing the Late Quaternary history and dynamics of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet.

Prof Steve Paterson

No biographical info given.

Dr Seth Barribeau

No biographical info given.

Dr Samantha Patrick

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Cornell

Dr Stephen Cornell

The University of Liverpool

Member of the evolutionary ecology research group seek to understand ecological and evolutionary patterns in nature, and to understand the feedback between ecology and evolution. Our work is diverse in terms of the organisms we study, the questions we investigate, and the approaches we use.

Prof. Terry Burke

No biographical info given.

Dr Tom Webb

Dr Tom Webb

The University of Sheffield

My primary research interest is in the macroecology of marine ecosystems. In particular, I am interested in how and why marine biodiversity is unevenly distributed in space and time. This interest has led me into the realm of biodiversity informatics – using large databases of different facets of marine diversity in order to synthesise the state of knowledge of the world’s oceans. My research is currently focused on three major areas:
Global patterns and trends in marine biodiversity – interrogating, linking, and extracting trends from major biodiversity databases using novel statistical methods
Comparative analysis of marine and terrestrial ecosystems – to what extent does ecological theory generalise across realms?
Dynamics of UK marine systems – integrating data and models to understand the provision of ecosystem services from UK seas.

Dr Thomas Price

Dr Thomas Price

The University of Liverpool

My main focus is selfish genetic elements and the ways that conflicts within the genome of individuals impact on the development and behaviour of individuals, the survival of populations, and in changing species at the landscape scale. In particular, I work on meiotic drive- selfish X chromosomes that spread by killing Y chromosome sperm, causing all female broods and distorting the sex ratios of whole populations. I try to understand the mechanisms that underly these drivers, and their ecological and evolutionary impacts on sex, speciation and survival.

A second theme is why some females choose to mate with only one male in their life, while others may mate with dozens a day.

More broadly, I also work on sexual cannibalism in mantids and spiders with my ACCE student, Adam Fisher. I also collaborate with ACCE student Chloe Heys on trying to understand why parrots masturbate so much.

Dr Virpi Lummaa

No biographical info given.

Dr Ville Friman

No biographical info given.

Prof George Wolff

No biographical info given.

Dr Zen Lewis

No biographical info given.

Dr Andrew Beckerman

Dr Andrew Beckerman

The University of Sheffield

Evolutionary Ecologist and Conservation Biologist working at the interface of Genes, Populations, Food Webs…. and Parrots

Aquatic Communities
• Algae and Daphnia Defences, Predator Induced Phenotypic Plasticity
Food Webs
• Foraging Biology and the Structure and Complexity of Communities
Parrots
•Conservation and Demography of Amazon Parrots with the World Parrot Trust

Dr Alison Wright

Dr Alison Wright

The University of Sheffield

Males and females of many species across the animal kingdom often look and behave very differently. However, the two sexes share an almost identical set of genes. So, how do these remarkable sex differences arise?

Sex chromosomes are the only region of the genome to differ between females and males, and are, therefore, predicted to play key roles in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. My research is centered on understanding the genomic and evolutionary processes underlying sex differences. In particular, I am interested in:

• the origins and turnover of sex chromosome systems
• sex chromosome degeneration
• role of the sex chromosomes in sexual dimorphism
• evolution of gene expression and dosage compensation
• genome evolution and sexual selection.

Prof Andy Fenton

Prof Andy Fenton

The University of Liverpool

I am interested in understanding the occurrence and consequences of interactions between species in natural communities – with a particular focus on infectious diseases. My work focuses on the use of simple mathematical theory, coupled with experimental perturbations of natural systems, to reveal the extent to which species interact, and whether those interactions are important for the dynamics of each species, or the stability of the community as a whole.
In terms of infectious diseases, I am particularly interested in whether co-circulating and co-infecting parasite species interact inside hosts, and whether those interactions affect the host’s susceptibility to infection or disease by other parasites. I am also interested in how multiple host species combine to determine the transmission and persistence of parasites at the host community level.

Prof Andrew Hodson

Prof Andrew Hodson

The University of Sheffield

Andy’s research largely takes places in the Arctic and Antarctica. Since climate warming signals can be so strong here, he considers the implications of ground thaw and glacier melt for the sensitive ecosystems that are often found at or near the ice margin. He also looks at the microbial ecosystems within the ice itself, since there are fewer habitats more vulnerable to the impacts of climate warming than ice and snow.

In the Arctic, Andy is currently leading a large European project funded via several national research councils (the Joint Programming Initiative). The emphasis of this project called “LowPerm” is the biogeochemical feedbacks associated with lowland permafrost thaw in the High Arctic. A video about the work that inspired this project can be seen here. http://lowperm.group.shef.ac.uk/

Dr Ann Rowan

Dr Ann Rowan

The University of Sheffield

Ann is a Research Fellow in Geography. Her research interests include:
The response of mountain glaciers to climate change
Geomorphology and dynamics of debris-covered glaciers
Glacier and hydrological change in the Himalaya

Dr Alistair Derby

Dr Alistair Derby

The University of Liverpool

Bioinformatics and Modelling
Evolutionary Ecology
Ecology, Evolution and Genomics of Infectious Disease
Microbiology

Dr Amy Pedersen

My research focuses on the importance of multi-host parasites and in particular on the factors that drive disease emergence. Much research in disease ecology and evolution focuses on the one host–one parasite framework. And yet, in natural systems, hosts are usually co-infected by multiple parasites, and many parasites can infect several host species. I focus on understanding host-parasite interactions in this realistic context. My past and current work have sought to significantly expand this perspective by (i) evaluating the interactions that occur between co-infecting parasites and their implications for host health and (ii) to advance our knowledge of how multi-host parasites contribute to disease emergence.

Dr Anu Thompson

No biographical info given.

Prof Ben Hatchwell

Prof Ben Hatchwell

The University of Sheffield

My principal research interest is in social evolution and reproductive strategies. The main approach of my research is to use field observations and experiments to test evolutionary theory.
Specific research interests and achievements include:
The ecological factors that promote the evolution of animal societies.
The influence of individual dispersal decisions on the genetic structure of populations and the consequences for cooperative behaviour.
The alternative reproductive strategies of individuals in cooperative groups and their fitness consequences.
Mechanisms of kin recognition in social animals.
Proximate and ultimate causes of variation in parental investment.
I am also interested in avian population ecology, including long-term studies of seabirds and the ecology of urban bird populations.

Dr Ben Woodcock

Dr Ben Woodcock

Ben Woodcock is an Ecological Entomologist in the Community Ecology Group at CEH Wallingford. He is involved in research that develops applied management solutions to enhancing ecosystems service delivery and biodiversity within arable and grassland ecosystems. This has focused principally on the development of agri-environment schemes, which are the main policy mechanism for changing the management of UK farming systems. His research has included projects for both the UK government (e.g. Defra and Natural England) and private sector (Syngenta).

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

Dr Jakob Bro-Jorgensen

The University of Liverpool

My current research interests centre on three areas: (i) sexual conflicts and the operation of sexual selection, (ii) the evolution and function of animal communication systems, and (iii) the optimization of conservation efforts. I investigate these topics taking theoretical as well as empirical approaches, primarily using ungulate study systems. My main field site is in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, where I have been running the Mara Antelope Research Project since 1998. I am a member of the IUCN Antelope Specialist Group (since 1994).

Prof Carlos Peres

Prof Carlos Peres

Large-scale patterns of large-bodied vertebrate diversity and abundance in Amazonian forests; effects of different forms on human disturbance, including hunting, habitat fragmentation, wildfires, natural regeneration, and fast-growing tree plantations on Amazonian biodiversity; population ecology and management of natural resources in tropical forests; reserve selection and design criteria in relation to regional gradients of biodiversity value and implementation costs.

Prof Charles Wellman

Prof Charles Wellman

The University of Sheffield

My research addresses the highly topical and controversial problem of the origin and early evolution of land plants. My research integrates evidence from both fossil and living plants. Fossil evidence is in the form of early land plant megafossils and dispersed microfossils—spores and fragments. I am currently working on material from China, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Kazakhstan and Spitsbergen. I study living plants in order to interpret the earliest land plant fossils [specifically through: (i) cladistic analyses of evolutionary relationships; (ii) molecular clock analyses of evolutionary divergence times; (iii) analysis of physiological adaptations required for plants to invade the land (particularly Evo-Devo studies on the molecular genetics of spore/pollen wall development)]. I am also exploring the impact of the invasion of the land by plants on global change. This has led to research into developing a novel (and currently only) proxy for past UV-B radiation. In recent years I have also extended my research back in time to examine a previously neglected research area considering the ‘algal scum’ that inhabited the land before it was invaded by plants.

Prof Chris Evans

Prof Chris Evans

Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem biogeochemistry, with a focus on semi-natural and managed uplands and peatlands. Interests include:
Trends and drivers of change in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems.
Field-scale measurement of fluxes and controls on the carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of natural, managed and restored peatlands in temperate and tropical regions, and the potential role of restoration and mitigation measures in reducing GHG emissions.
Sources, processing and fate of terrestrially-derived organic matter in aquatic ecosystems, from headwater streams and lakes to estuaries and coastal waters, and the contribution of this flux to anthropogenic GHG emissions
Controls on the cycling of atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur in terrestrial ecosystems, including controls on leaching to surface waters, ecosystem nitrogen saturation, recovery from acidification, the role modifying land-use factors such as forestry, grazing and burning, and links on the carbon cycle.
Impacts of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on hydrological and biogeochemical processes, particularly in relation to water quality extremes and their ecological impacts.
Ecosystem-scale biogeochemical modelling of the impacts of atmospheric N and S deposition, ozone (O3), climate change and land-use on terrestrial productivity, C balance, soil and water chemistry and plant species diversity.
Synthesis of scientific understanding to take account of multiple anthropogenic drivers and ecosystem functions in support of the policy, particularly in relation to land-management.

Prof Chris Thomas

Prof Chris Thomas

The University of York

Chris and his research group are interested in understanding how humans have transformed the biological world, and how humans might protect the world’s remaining biodiversity. His research and scientific publications fall into three main areas:

Why and how species respond to climate change. Chris was the first to estimate how climate change might endanger biodiversity at a global scale. His research group has provided evidence that species move their geographic distributions as the climate changes (YouTube interview), and they are currently evaluating distribution changes and evolution in species that are responding to climate change.

Dr Colin Beale

Dr Colin Beale

The University of York

I work on a wide range of ecological problems from population dynamics and distributions to fire ecology in the African savannah. The main linking thread of my research is a fundamental interest in spatial processes in ecology, from the way individual animals move across a landscape, through the patterns and processes that shape individual species distributions, to global patterns in biodiversity. I’m interested in understanding all aspects of spatial variation in ecological processes at a range of spatial scales, using and developing appropriate statistical techniques alongside an active programme of field research in the UK and Africa. Currently, many species distributions are shifting as a consequence of global climate change and I’m also interested in the demographic processes that drive such shifts. Much of my work focusses on birds and I collaborate with conservation organisations to ensure that a variety of additional interests tackle problems of practical significance.

Prof Colin Brown

Prof Colin Brown

The University of York

Current research focuses on integrated catchment management, working within the Water Friendly Farming platform to design and test interventions that deliver co-benefits for downstream flood risk, sediment delivery to water, as well as water quality (nutrients, pesticides) and aquatic biodiversity. Colin has advised UK Government through membership of the Advisory Committee on Pesticides and chairing its Environmental Panel. He has chaired a European working group on Environmental Risk Assessment, and the BioResources Group of the Society of Chemical Industry. He Chairs the conference on Pesticide Behaviour in Soils, Water and Air held every four years in York. Colin is Associate Dean (Research) within the Faculty of Sciences (2015-2019).

Dr Colin McClean

Dr Colin McClean

The University of York

General research interests involve the application of spatial analysis and GIS to environmental management. Research efforts in geography, the environmental sciences, ecology and environmental economics are strongly linked by the spatial distributions of the phenomena they seek to study. Many working in the field of GIS aim to develop new manipulation and analysis tools, however, the potential applications of relatively simple GIS analysis, in all of the above areas of study, has only begun to be explored. The major limitation to the exploitation of the tools that have been developed has been the paucity and quality of existing spatial data sets. These datasets are increasingly available, providing opportunities to consider environmental problems at the landscape, regional and global scales, where before only field-level studies might have been possible.

Dr Darrel Swift

The University of Sheffield

Glacial erosion and long-term landscape evolution
Glacial sediment systems and landform evolution processes
Luminescence as a process tracer in glacial sediment systems
Glacier hydrology and fluvioglacial sediment systems

Dr Dylan Childs

Dr Dylan Childs

The University of Sheffield

Life history theory – Characterising optimal reproductive strategies and components of selection in free-living populations.
Evolutionary demography – Application of evolutionary game theory (aka adaptive dynamics) to long-term demographic datasets.
Structured population modelling – Construction / parameterisation of accurate demographic models (e.g. integral projection models).
Host-parasite dynamics – Exploring the impact of environmental variation on dynamics (e.g. seasonal forcing in malaria)

Prof David Beerling

Prof David Beerling

The University of Sheffield

My interdisciplinary research group focuses on fundamental questions concerning how photosynthetic terrestrial ecosystems and the global environment co-evolved over the last half billion years. Our approach integrates evidence from fossils, experiments with terrestrial organisms, and rigorous theoretical models applied across spatial scales. We focus particularly on key processes and interactions important for revealing insights into the conquest of the land by plants, and the role of terrestrial ecosystems in shaping global ecology, climate and atmospheric composition. Our research findings also inform understanding of current anthropogenic climate change issues facing humanity.

Dr Donatella Zona

Dr Donatella Zona

The University of Sheffield

My main research emphasizes the impact of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and greenhouse gas emission (CO2 and CH4) in the Arctic.
My interest ranges from the mechanisms allowing tundra ecosystems to adjust or avoid environmental stress and how climate change affects ecosystem functioning to the importance and the challenges of integrating different scales and approaches to understanding the patterns and controls on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in the Arctic.

Dr David Edwards

Dr David Edwards

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on understanding the impacts of land-use change on tropical biodiversity. I am particularly interested in understanding the most effective ways of managing tropical landscapes for biodiversity protection and the mechanisms that can be used to fund protection, although I have a range of interests, including:
Impacts of logging management on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning;
Tropical agriculture and sustainability;
The interaction between climate change and land-use change on extinction risk;
Cost-effective conservation within the tropics;
Policy drivers of tropical forest protection, including REDD+ and sustainability labeling;
Mechanisms of maintenance in mutualism;

Dr David Atkinson

Dr David Atkinson

The University of Liverpool

My passion is ecological and biological synthesis that brings new understanding of impacts of climatic and other environmental perturbation on organisms and ecosystems.Our investigations focus particularly on the fundamental impacts of temperature, body size and resource flux on rates of biological processes at levels of organization ranging from individuals to ecosystems. These biological processes include individual resource uptake, growth, development, population growth, ecosystem respiration and photosynthesis. We work at the interface of ecology, evolution and physiology, and our approaches include advancing new theory, including a novel metabolic scaling theory; performing experiments on whole pond ecosystems and populations; and carrying out meta-analyses to quantify global trends.

Dr Daniel Chapman

Dr Daniel Chapman

I lead projects modelling the dispersal, spread and impacts of non-native invasive plants and pest organisms. These models are important in understanding the biological processes driving invasion and for planning effective control strategies.
Major science questions include:

Are large-scale patterns of invasion constrained by species dispersal, global transport networks and climate?
What are the best ways to conduct surveillance and control of invasive species?
What is the role of trait adaptation in promoting invasion?
How do invasive non-native species integrate into ecological networks?

Prof Douglas Yu

Prof Douglas Yu

We study cooperation in two of its manifestations:
Conservation (cooperation between humans and nature) and
Mutualisms (cooperation between species).
See my personal webpage for more detail: www.douglasyu.org/research/

Dr David Rippin

Dr David Rippin

The University of York

My research interests are focussed on the controls on the dynamics of glaciers and ice-sheets, and the use of ground-based and airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) techniques in exploring englacial and subglacial environments. I also work on the thermal evolution of small Arctic glaciers, and is increasingly interested in supraglacial environments, and devising approaches for monitoring change in these locations.

Dr Elva Robinson

Dr Elva Robinson

I am a lecturer at the University of York, working on social behaviour. Social structure in animal groups affects how robust a population is to stresses such as disease, disturbance by humans, or habitat fragmentation. Effects of environmental change on animal social structure are challenging to study but have wide reaching implications for conservation and management. My research uses fieldwork, laboratory experiments and theoretical modelling. I use ants as a model system which can be manipulated at both the individual and group levels, allowing thorough exploration of the rules governing social behaviour and interaction with the environment.

Dr Francis Daunt

Dr Francis Daunt

Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
My main interests lie in understanding the drivers of change in seabird populations. North Sea seabirds have shown recent population declines, and my research aims to understand the effects of climate change, disease, fisheries and marine energy developments. My approach is to gain a detailed understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of individual behaviour and physiology that determine demographic parameters.

Dr Gareth Fraser

Dr Gareth Fraser

The University of Sheffield

Evolution and development of jaws and teeth
Evolutionary history of vertebrate innovations
Genetic basis of morphological diversity
My research is focused on the evolution and development of morphological diversity in fishes. I am interested in a range of evo-devo models from cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi to the catshark. I investigate a range of themes (i) how genetic networks maintain the continuous production of teeth, (ii) genetic mechanisms affecting dental diversity, (iii) the evolution and development of the pharyngeal/branchial arches, and (iv) the evolution of sensory elaborations in early vertebrates

Dr Gareth Phoenix

Dr Gareth Phoenix

The University of Sheffield

In the Phoenix lab we study the interactions between plants and the environment, particularly in Arctic, northern boreal and upland ecosystems.

Our research includes the impacts of climate change (warming, extreme events, snow regime change, precipitation), UV-B radiation and pollution on ecosystem structure and function. We study the impacts on biodiversity, on cycling of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and the consequences for feedback to climate (ecosystem carbon balance). We also aim to understand how responses observed at the vegetation/ecosystem level are driven by individual plant, root and leaf responses.

Dr Garry Hayman

Dr Garry Hayman

Garry’s current research interests cover terrestrial biosphere and land-atmosphere interactions and the use of Earth Observation data for model evaluation. He is currently involved in a number of projects concerning methane emissions from boreal and African wetlands (NERC African Wetlands and NERC Methane and other Greenhouse Gases in the Arctic – measurements, process studies and modelling), which use surface and satellite atmospheric methane measurements to assess the methane wetland emission parameterisation in the JULES land surface model (https://jules.jchmr.org/).

Dr Gavin Thomas

Dr Gavin Thomas

The University of Sheffield

Phylogeny, diversification and trait evolution
My research focuses on modelling the diversification of species and traits at a macroevolutionary scale. I am particularly interested in how we can use information on the phylogenetic relationships among species to infer how present-day biodiversity has arisen over time and ask:

How and why do lineages and traits diversify?
What are the consequences of varying tempo and mode of lineage and trait evolution for temporal and spatial patterns of diversity?
My lab is currently preoccupied with collecting a large database of bill shapes and plumage colours from all extant bird species (~10,000 species) using museum study skins (mainly the NHM at Tring and also the University of Manchester Museum).
You can get involved with this ERC-funded project with our Bird bill citizen science website: markmybird.org.

Prof Greg Hurst

Prof Greg Hurst

The University of Liverpool

Many insects carry microbes that distort their host sex ratio, favouring the production and survival of female hosts. I work to establish:
a) How these microbes change the ecology of their host, in terms of mating system and the spread of sexually transmitted infections.
b) How they drive the evolution of their host, for instance, the evolution of sex-determining systems.
This work uses butterflies, ladybird, Drosophila and Nasonia jewel wasp as model systems in the field and the laboratory.

Prof Grant Bigg

Prof Grant Bigg

The University of Sheffield

The common theme of all my research until recently has been marine climate change. However, many threads contribute to this theme. A major thread is the use, and development, of ocean circulation models to understand climate change on scales from global and millennial to local and sub-monthly. I use a combination of models and remote sensing, with interpreting oceanographic and lower atmospheric data, to increase our understanding of the climatic interaction between the atmosphere and ocean. I use iceberg trajectories to study glacial freshwater inputs to modern and Quaternary oceans. My primary focus of recent years can be divided into the global thermohaline circulation, icebergs and tropical climate change. More recently, however, there has begun to be an increased emphasis on the role environmental change plays in society.
Global thermohaline circulation
Icebergs
Tropical climate change

Dr Ilik Saccheri

The University of Liverpool

My early interest was on the impact of genetic factors on components of fitness and extinction risk in small populations (conservation genetics), and I continue to study the genetic basis of inbreeding depression using butterflies and moths as model systems. The other main thread to my research aims to understand the genetic architecture of rapid adaptation, primarily through reconstructing the evolutionary origins and dynamics of industrial melanism in moths, but also in other contexts.

Prof Jon Slate

Prof Jon Slate

The University of Sheffield

Genetic architecture and evolution of fitness traits in wild populations
Genome mapping
Inbreeding & inbreeding depression

Dr Jack Thomson

Dr Jack Thomson

The University of Liverpool

Most of my work focuses on behavioural ecology, examining intraspecific variation in personality amongst a variety of organisms. Currently my main interests are in aggression and boldness, particularly in fish and in crustaceans.

Dr James Chong

Dr James Chong

The University of York

Molecular biologist with an interest in (anaerobic) microbial communities. My group utilises a range of ‘omics methods to chart dynamic changes.

Dr Jamie Wood

Dr Jamie Wood

The University of York

My current research interests are in the field of complexity and emergent phenomena in biologically inspired models. This is primarily focused on understanding how we may use both computational and analytic techniques in statistical mechanics to further our knowledge of the stability and robustness of natural systems. This is a broad area, and my current work includes: extending models based on James Lovelock’s Daisyworld parable including looking for links to established theories in quantitative genetics; investigating flocking or herding behaviour in animals, and how these systems can be related to models of network rewiring; developing primitive models of quorum sensing in bacteria, especially understanding spatial effects and how this may lead to biofilm formation.

Prof Jane Hill

Prof Jane Hill

The University of York

Jane’s research group studies the impacts of climate change and habitat loss on species, with fieldwork in Britain and Borneo. Jane’s Ph.D. examined migration in UK moths and her research has mainly focused on the environmental factors affecting population dynamics of butterflies and moths since then. After post-doc research in Birmingham, Leeds, and Durham Universities, Jane joined the University of York in 2001 and became Professor of Ecology in 2010. Current research projects are studying climate-driven range shifts of species at their leading-edge (i.e patterns of colonisation and range expansion) and trailing-edge range boundaries (i.e. local extinction rates), and the factors affecting species’ ability to respond to climate and habitat changes (including investigating evidence for evolutionary adaptation to climate). We are exploring potential methods for promoting adaptation of biodiversity to climate warming, for example by examining whether or not improving habitat connectivity will aid species’ range shifts and the role of Protected Areas. We are also exploring issues around the environmental sustainability of oil palm cultivation and testing certification standards.
Jane is a trustee of the SE Asia Rainforest Research Partnership, a trustee and member of Council of the British Ecological Society, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society. She received a Marsh/ZSL Award for Conservation Biology in 2011. Jane is involved in promoting women in science and led the York Biology Department to an Athena SWAN Gold Award in 2014.

Prof Jane Hurst

Prof Jane Hurst

The University of Liverpool

My main interests are in the functions, mechanisms and evolution of scent communication in mammals, animal welfare (particularly in relation to laboratory animals), rodent pest control, and the interactions between behaviour and disease.

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

Prof Jane Thomas-Oates

The University of York

My group’s research is focused on the structural analysis of biologically-active molecules in order to understand better their mechanism of action at the molecular level. Our primary technique is mass spectrometry, which we use in conjunction with a wide variety of other analytical techniques, including chemical, enzymatic and separations strategies, principally for application in proteomic and metabolomic studies. The group’s research has an emphasis on pursuing long-term, integrated studies of biological systems, which means that multidisciplinary collaborations are of prime importance; we are very fortunate in having a range of ongoing projects with a set of long-term and expert collaborators.

Dr Jenny Hodgson

Dr Jenny Hodgson

The University of Liverpool

I am a conservation biologist. I research how the spatial arrangement of land use and management affects the viability of species, and how climate change interacts with land use. I use a mixture of empirical and modelling approaches.

I serve as Early Career Researcher representative on the ACCE management board and I hope to represent the views of ECR supervisors in general. If you are an ECR and potential supervisor at any ACCE institution, please email me to be added to my mailing list.

Dr Jon Pitchford

No biographical info given.

Dr Jon Green

Dr Jon Green

The University of Liverpool

My research interests lie at the interface of the traditional disciplines of ecology, physiology and behaviour. My work focuses on seabirds, as these animals must adapt be adapted to two contrasting environments: the challenges of foraging in a big, deep, cold, dark, distant water body are very different to those that they face while breeding and moulting on land. Furthermore, both of these environments and their associated challenges change naturally on a seasonal and annual basis and are under anthropogenic threats from over-fishing, climate change and renewable energy developments.

Prof Jonathan Sharples

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Blanchard

No biographical info given.

Dr Julia Ferrari

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Dr Karl Bates

The University of Liverpool

My research concentrates on the functional anatomy of terrestrial vertebrates, with particular focus on the locomotor system. My goal is to understand the links between morphology and limb biomechanics in order
 to better characterize how animals achieve their full range of habitual motions. This has led
 me to study a range of living tetrapods from primates to archosaurs in order to further our understanding of major evolutionary transitions in locomotor biomechanics.

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

Dr Kanchon Dasmahapatra

The University of York

Research centres on understanding the process of speciation in heliconiine and ithomiine butterflies. Both groups of butterflies are found in the neotropics and are noted for the diversity of wing colour patterns found within species, as well as also for mimetic convergence of colour patterns between species (Müllarian mimicry).

Making use of the Heliconius melpomene reference genome, the current focus involves using high-throughput sequencing approaches to understand the speciation process at the scale of the genome. In particular we are investigating genome-wide patterns of divergence, adaptive introgression, and quantifying the amount of genomic exchange between species.

Dr Karl Evans

No biographical info given.

Dr Kate Parr

Dr Kate Parr

The University of Liverpool

I am a community ecologist with a particular interest in understanding how tropical grassy systems are structured, how they function and the best way to conserve them. Much of my work, and that of my research group, focuses on invertebrates – particularly social insects.

Dr Kathryn Arnold

Dr Kathryn Arnold

The University of York

Ecologist, working mainly on the behavioural and physiological responses of vertebrates to changes in the environment. My current research falls mainly into two areas: 1) the assessment of exposure to and effects of contaminants on wildlife and 2) the ecology of rural and urban birds. However, I also maintain an interest in the social behaviour of birds, insects, fish and manta rays.

Dr Kelly Redeker

No biographical info given.

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

Dr Kristiaan D’Août

The University of Liverpool

My overarching research interest is how animals (and primarily humans) move. That is very general, so in my work I focus on musculo-skeletal biomechanics, with evolutionary aspects always (at least) in the back of my mind.
I am particulary interested in the biomechanics of the healthy human shod and unshod foot.

Dr Lisa Emberson

No biographical info given.

Prof Lorraine Maltby

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Bateman

Prof Mark Bateman

The University of Sheffield

My high profile collaborative research focuses on past aeolian landscapes as an archive for better understanding past depositional processes and environmental changes. Three themes are centred around this:
– As aeolian deposits, both arid zone and cold-climate, are widespread in the Quaternary sedimentary record they can provide key data for understanding previous palaeoenvironmental conditions and inform the archaeological record;
– Novel applications of luminescence dating has allowed a better understanding of the integrity of preserved sandy sediments;
– Research is also currently trying to extend the application of luminescence dating to glacial and ice marginal sediments.

Dr Mirre Simons

No biographical info given.

Prof Mark Hodson

No biographical info given.

Prof Mike Begon

Prof Mike Begon

The University of Liverpool

The ecology of infectious diseases in wildlife populations, especially diseases transmisible to humans, both within the UK and worldwide (e.g. leptospirosis in Brazilian favelas and bubonic plague in Central Asia).

Prof Michael Brockhurst

Prof Michael Brockhurst

The University of York

Rapid contemporary evolution can have important applied consequences, and particularly so in microbes, whose short generation times and large populations potentiate high evolutionary rates. My lab employs a diversity of study systems and a broad range of approaches including laboratory experimental evolution, surveys of natural communities, analysis of clinical samples, next-generation sequencing, and mathematical modelling to address both pure and applied research questions in coevolution, diversification and adaptation.

Dr Nigel Dunnett

No biographical info given.

Dr Nicola Nadeau

Dr Nicola Nadeau

The University of Sheffield

The evolution and genetics of colour pattern variation
The genetic and developmental control of structural colours in animals
The process of divergence and speciation within the genome
The genetic analysis of natural hybrid zones to identify loci under selection.
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of adaptive evolution, speciation and sexual selection in natural populations. The major focus of my current research is the evolution and genetics of convergent iridescent structural colour in Heliconius butterflies.

Dr. Nick Isaac

No biographical info given.

Dr Nathan Jeffery

No biographical info given.

Dr. Niall McNamara

No biographical info given.

Dr Oliver Craig

Dr Oliver Craig

The University of York

Specialises in biomolecular archaeology, i.e. the recovery of proteins, lipids and DNA from ancient skeletal remains and archaeological artefacts to provide insights into past human activities.
His particular interests lie in temporal transitions and variability in human diets, cuisine and subsistence practices and the impact that dietary changes had on social evolution, health and the environment.
Oliver is interested in combining a broad range of analytical techniques to study palaeodiet but particularly stable isotope analysis of human bone and organic residue analysis of food remains on ceramics.His research has focused on the analysis of materials from key prehistoric sites in Central and Eastern Europe and along the North East Atlantic, Baltic and Mediterranean coastlines.

Prof Owen Petchey

No biographical info given.

Prof Paul Blackwell

Prof Paul Blackwell

The University of Sheffield

I mainly work in Bayesian statistics; I am interested in the development of new models and methodology, particularly inference for random processes, driven by real applications which are primarily in ecology but also in environmental science, archaeology and other areas. I am also interested in stochastic modelling, statistics and simulation more generally, again often with ecological and environmental applications.

Prof Paula Stockley

Prof Paula Stockley

The University of Liverpool

My research aims to explain diversity in animal reproductive traits, with emphasis on mechanisms and evolutionary consequences of sperm competition and sexual selection, particularly in mammals. I also have broad interests in the fields of behavioural and evolutionary ecology relating to reproductive strategies, life history evolution and social behaviour. Current projects include experimental and comparative studies of ejaculate expenditure, copulatory behaviour, genital evolution, male mate choice and female competition. Multidisciplinary collaborations apply molecular and proteomics techniques to address evolutionary questions within these areas.

Prof Philip H Warren

No biographical info given.

Dr Penny Spikins

No biographical info given.

Dr Peter Mayhew

The University of York

No biographical info given.

Prof J Peter W Young

No biographical info given.

Prof Piran White

No biographical info given.

Prof Rob Freckleton

Prof Rob Freckleton

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on modelling population and community dynamics. I am particularly interested in large scale population dynamics, although have a range of interests, including:
Plant population ecology, modelling plant populations, modelling weed populations.
Evolutionary ecology, phylogenetic comparative methodology and its application to ecological problems.
Theoretical ecology, statistical methodology.

Dr Rob Bryant

No biographical info given.

Dr Bob Johnston

The University of Sheffield

My research focuses on the environmental histories of landscapes in the UK, with a specific interest in the uplands and the coastal fringe of northwest Wales. I am working with PhD students on late Holocene sea level change in north Cardigan Bay and the impacts of future climate change on estuarine landscapes of SW Snowdonia.

Prof Roger Butlin

Prof Roger Butlin

The University of Sheffield

My research is concerned primarily with the origin of barriers to gene exchange, especially the evolutionary genetics of reproductive isolation. I have used insect acoustic and chemical signals as model systems to investigate the controversial process of reinforcement, particularly in parapatry, and questions such as the inheritance of signal characters and the form of female preferences. I am currently working with hybrid zones in grasshoppers of the genus Chorthippus, and collaborating in projects on speciation in winkles (Littorina), and signal and response evolution in the Drosophila virilis group. Another area of research concerns the evolution of asexual reproduction using ostracods as models. I am interested in evolution at range margins and its implications for conservation genetics. Current projects use Arabidopsis lyrata and other models. I collaborate in studies of population structure and sexual segregation in bats, behaviour of zebrafish, ecology and evolution of mosquitoes and beetle phylogeography.

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

Dr Roberto Salguero-Gómez

The University of Sheffield

NERC IRF at the Department of Animal & Plant Science of the University of Sheffield. He joined the faculty in 2016 as an NERC IRF. His research group (@SalGoTeam) focuses on understanding the mechanisms that constrain and diversify life history traits and life history strategies in animals and plants. His work uses a combination of approaches that include functional ecology, population ecology, comparative biology and formal demography.

2002: BSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz, Spain
2004: MSc Environmental Sciences, Univ Cadiz & Kingston Univ, UK
2011: Ph.D. Ecology, Evolution and Biodiversity, Univ Pennsylvania, USA

Dr Rhonda Snook

Dr Rhonda Snook

The University of Sheffield

Reproduction and development define life and therefore are fundamental to understanding the evolution of biodiversity. My primary research interest is the evolution of reproductive strategies, focussing on gamete evolution, fertilisation, sexual selection, and speciation. I have addressed these areas using Drosophila fruit flies as model systems. My lab uses a variety of different approaches to study reproductive strategies, including population and quantitative genetics, experimental evolution, and recently next generation sequencing, at both a population and landscape scales. Current projects include the evolution of postmating prezygotic reproductive isolation and how climate change may impact reproduction.

Prof Richard Shore

No biographical info given.

Prof Roland Gehrels

Prof Roland Gehrels

The University of York

I grew up in the Netherlands where I studied Quaternary Geology at the Free University in Amsterdam. I completed a PhD at the University of Maine in Geology in 1994 and continued my academic career as a sea-level scientist, first as a postdoc at Durham University, and then for 18 years at Plymouth University. In 2013 I accepted a Chair in Physical Geography at the University of York. In the past decade my research efforts have focussed primarily on the coupling of geological field evidence with tide-gauge observations to reconstruct historical sea-level changes using proxy methods. My main achievement is the reconstruction of the acceleration of sea-level rise during the first decades of the 20th century in sites around the North Atlantic and the Southwest Pacific. This work has led to the realisation that recent rapid sea-level changes occur on a global scale and are linked to global warming. In recent years my research has taken on a new societal dimension with relevance for sea-level predictions. An example of this is my involvement in the iGlass project (http://www.highstand.org/iglass) which represents an attempt to apply the sea-level reconstruction methods developed for Holocene intertidal sediments to earlier interglacial sequences, with direct implications for understanding the dynamics of ice sheets.

Prof Steven Banwart

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Livingstone

Dr Stephen Livingstone

My research interests are in reconstructing ice sheets and their dynamics from geological and geophysical evidence in both marine and terrestrial environments. They can be summarised as follows:

1. Investigating the drainage and storage of meltwater at the bed of (palaeo-)ice sheets.
2. The identification and investigation of landform-sediment assemblages and physical processes at the bed of palaeo-ice streams, and the controls governing their retreat.
4. Reconstructing the Late Quaternary history and dynamics of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet.

Prof Steve Paterson

No biographical info given.

Dr Seth Barribeau

No biographical info given.

Dr Samantha Patrick

No biographical info given.

Dr Stephen Cornell

Dr Stephen Cornell

The University of Liverpool

Member of the evolutionary ecology research group seek to understand ecological and evolutionary patterns in nature, and to understand the feedback between ecology and evolution. Our work is diverse in terms of the organisms we study, the questions we investigate, and the approaches we use.

Prof. Terry Burke

No biographical info given.

Dr Tom Webb

Dr Tom Webb

The University of Sheffield

My primary research interest is in the macroecology of marine ecosystems. In particular, I am interested in how and why marine biodiversity is unevenly distributed in space and time. This interest has led me into the realm of biodiversity informatics – using large databases of different facets of marine diversity in order to synthesise the state of knowledge of the world’s oceans. My research is currently focused on three major areas:
Global patterns and trends in marine biodiversity – interrogating, linking, and extracting trends from major biodiversity databases using novel statistical methods
Comparative analysis of marine and terrestrial ecosystems – to what extent does ecological theory generalise across realms?
Dynamics of UK marine systems – integrating data and models to understand the provision of ecosystem services from UK seas.

Dr Thomas Price

Dr Thomas Price

The University of Liverpool

My main focus is selfish genetic elements and the ways that conflicts within the genome of individuals impact on the development and behaviour of individuals, the survival of populations, and in changing species at the landscape scale. In particular, I work on meiotic drive- selfish X chromosomes that spread by killing Y chromosome sperm, causing all female broods and distorting the sex ratios of whole populations. I try to understand the mechanisms that underly these drivers, and their ecological and evolutionary impacts on sex, speciation and survival.

A second theme is why some females choose to mate with only one male in their life, while others may mate with dozens a day.

More broadly, I also work on sexual cannibalism in mantids and spiders with my ACCE student, Adam Fisher. I also collaborate with ACCE student Chloe Heys on trying to understand why parrots masturbate so much.

Dr Virpi Lummaa

No biographical info given.

Dr Ville Friman

No biographical info given.

Prof George Wolff

No biographical info given.

Dr Zen Lewis

No biographical info given.