Engagement portal


Ways to collaborate with us

There are lots of different ways to collaborate with us and we’re open to new ideas. ACCE vision is to develop motivated, confident and multi-skilled students, undertaking cutting edge research, tackling environmental science questions of global significance, with the capacity to move between NERC scientific fields, and other areas, relating the science they undertake to business, policy, public needs, and society.

 

 

What is a CASE studentship?

The Co‐operative Awards in Science and Engineering (CASE) scheme aims to promote partnerships between Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) and other bodies, which will enhance the training received by the PhD student and will help the student to gain first‐hand experience of work outside a purely academic environment.

Who can be a CASE partner?

Any and all partners within our DTP may act as CASE partners provided they are eligible. An eligible CASE partner may be any non‐academic organisation within the public, private or third sector that has research interests within the NERC remit. This includes private industry, the research organisations of the nationalised industries, public bodies such as regional companies, county planning offices and public sector research establishments and similar overseas bodies. NERC’s remit is broad and covers all environment based science, from physical and chemical atmospherics through the geosciences to all aspects of life science. CASE partner have to be UK based and International partners can be eligible if they are able to offer the opportunity to gain skills that could not be provided by a UK-based equivalent, which could be justified by providing highly specialist skills which will be unique to an organisation’s geographical location, facilities, or way of working

Why become an ACCE CASE partner?

Research and training opportunities within ACCE will be expanded and strengthened significantly through contributions from our CASE partners. ACCE has 28 CASE partners who complement the disciplinary components of ACCE. Many of these CASE partners (e.g. FERA, Forest Research, Natural England, Parsons Brinckerhoff) already work in a multidisciplinary context, and bring that experience with them to the partnership. The CASE partnership agreements will provide ACCE students with unprecedented access to datasets across the biological, environmental and social sciences. The CASE partners will also provide the interface to business, policy and society, both informally and formally through training courses such as entrepreneurship and communications. This will ensure that ACCE students are not only multidisciplinary in terms of their understanding, but are also able to communicate their science to diverse audiences in a range of different situations, and recognise opportunities for its wider application such as promoting benefits to the economy and society.

Profiles of potential collaborators

 


 From industry


Lev Ginzburg, Applied Biomathematics

lev@ramas.com

Key expertise: Theoretical (mathematical) ecology; applied ecology; quantitative methods and software; applied evolution: agriculture pests; health antibiotic resistance

Provisions: Experience of RAMAS software and expertise in maths and stats training, joint collaborative work and CASE studentships supervision.


David Viner, Mott MacDonald

david.viner@mottmac.com

Key expertise: Strategy development, climate resilience, research development, operational solutions.

Provisions: 25 years of experience in the academy, business and policy. I am delivering on the ground real world solutions across the globe for climate resilience.


Gerard Clover, Royal Horticultural Society

gerardclover@rhs.org

Key expertise: Pathways of implementation of research; public outreach activities, including at schools and communities; practical research based on needs of horticulture, citizen science, plants taxonomy, environmental science, plant pathology and entomology.

Provisions: Research labs, scientific expertise.


Stephanie Race, Crop Performance Ltd

srace@crop-performance.com

Key expertise: Remote sensing, crop modelling, grower decision support systems, plant phenotyping, crop disease forecasting & smart spray management, IPM”

Provisions: We are interested in collaboration on Soil Fertility Projet; High Throughput Phenotyping Platform and Economic Model for Sustainable Agriculture Practices


Henry King, Unilever

henry.king@unilever.com

Key expertise: Scientific expertise and networks in sustainability and chemical toxicity; modelling and risk assessment. Henry is Unilever’s corporate issue manager for climate change.

Provisions: Access and collaboration on environmental/sustainability challenges, potential funding.


From NGOs


Martin Varley, Cheshire Wildlife Trust

mvarley@cheshirewt.org.uk

Key expertise: We are looking to use science and evidence more to underpin our conservation work. We carry out a range of conservation activities around land management and species conservation. At present our research is limited by capacity but involves primarily MSc or BSc dissertation students looking at various aspects of conservation management.

Provisions: Ecological network functionality and mapping, conservation genetics, dragonfly ecology, lowland raised bog studies, health and wellbeing benefits of nature.


Rob Robinson, BTO

rob.robinson@bto.org

Key expertise: Avian population ecology and conservation

Provisions: Potential for training in bird handling techniques, and possibly also statistics (eg linear modelling); large-scale data on birds population; analytical expertise, volunteer networks


Rob Field, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds

rob.field@rspb.org.uk

Key expertise: Landscape-scale conservation, ecosystem-based climate change mitigation, sustainable arable agriculture, wetlands conservation.

Provisions: Experience in conservation management; provision of short-term placements; KE and translation of science into policy.


Helen Senn, Royal Zoological Society of Scotland

hsenn@rzss.org.uk

Key expertise: Conservation genetics, species restoration

Provisions: Real world conservation knowledge, links to national and international NGOs networks and governmental conservation projects; co-supervision of students; provision of short-term placements; access to zoo and ‘Wild genes’ facility.


From Public  Research Sector


Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens

w.baker@kew.org

Key expertise: Plant diversity research

Provisions: Kew Royal Botanical Gardens is interested in participating in research projects that chime with its science strategic direction; Kew RBG runs a number of courses (e.g. NERC-funded taxonomy course, tropical plant identification course) which could be open to ACCE students.


Alison Melvin, Forest Research

alison.melvin@forestry.gsi.gov.uk

Key expertise: All aspects of forestry sector and integrated land use, including: climate adaptation and mitigation; resilience of forests to threats including pests and diseases, IAS, fire, planning, drought, biodiversity, landscape-scale planning, mosaic habitats, green infrastructure, timber properties, biomass, plant genetics and breeding, social and economic research, use of GIS mapping and Earth observation.


Simon Gregory, British Geological Survey

simongr@bgs.ac.uk

Key expertise: Environmental change; geochemistry; paleoenvironment; microbiological ecology – how does change in the environment affect microbes and how does that impact back on the environment;

Provisions: Interested to become a CASE partner; soils/core collections and database; soils modelling; landscape change


Mike Morecroft, Natural England

mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk

Key expertise: Ecosystems and biodiversity conservation; climate change impacts, adaptation and mitigation in the natural environment.

Provisions: Wide ranging interests in climate change and ecosystems, evaluation of the effectiveness of environmental management in protecting biodiversity and ecosystem services, potential projects across Natural England’s remit.


Zerina Johanson, Natural History Museum

z.johanson@nhm.ac.uk

Key expertise: Evolution of early vertebrates

Provisions: Natural history museum collections for research projects: palaeontology, mineralogy, life sciences; research expertise; scientific research projects related to environmental challenges, dedicated molecular imaging, scanning facilities at the NHM imaging and analysis centre.


Candice Howarth, Global Sustainability Institute

candice.howarth@anglia.ac.uk

Key expertise: Climate change communication, engagement and action.

Provisions: Designing a collaborative research project on co-production of climate knowledge and action between future leaders, practitioners and the policy communities.


From Policy


Alwyn Hart, Environment Agency

alwyn.hart@environment-agency.gov.uk

Key expertise: managing of teams working on topics of environmental interest across air, land and water media.  This includes a wide range of diverse subjects, for example, hydroecology, bio-aerosols, pollutant attenuation, eco-toxicology, fisheries;

Provisions: KE and translation of science into policy; provision of short-term placements; an experience of working with a public body on e.g. flood and coastal risk management, catchment protection and water quality; data sets, research sites.


Debbie Burkley-Golder, Innovate UK

debbie.buckley-golder@innovateuk.gov.uk

Key expertise: Environmental policy support for UK government and the UK and NERC science

Provisions: Specialist in academia-business partnerships and knowledge exchange (ran the KTP for 9 years). UK facilitators support/funds/business-academia partnerships


Ian Holmes, Innovate UK

ian.holmes@innovateuk.gov.uk

Key expertise: I am the H2020 National Contact Point for Food Security, Sustainable Agriculture and Forestry, Blue Growth and the Bioeconomy.

Provisions: Advice and assist UK organisations wishing to access EC H2020 funding in the above areas.


David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage

david.obrien@snh.gov.uk

Key expertise: KE and dissemination of research with the user community, translating research into conservation management, expertise in development of environmental policy

Provisions: Co-supervision of students; a providing experience of operational science in a government agency at the research-policy interface, access to sites for research across Scotland. links to community groups in Scotland.

How to apply for CASE studentships with ACCE

If you have a research project idea and you would like to be involved with ACCE and become a CASE partner, here’s what you should do:

  • On the ACCE website look at the research descriptions of academics/supervisors from ACCE academic partner institutions (Universities of Sheffield, York and Liverpool, CEH) working in the relevant area. If there is someone with appropriate research interests then contact them directly to discuss your idea. If not, contact the ACCE manager Dr Venelina Koleva (v.g.koleva@sheffield.ac.uk or acce.dtp@sheffield.ac.uk ).
  • Develop your project proposal together with the ACCE researcher. The call for proposals occurs each summer (dates will be announced on the ACCE website). The deadline for project submission will be in September each year until 2018 when the last ACCE cohort will be recruited.
  • Projects submitted to ACCE will be ranked and selected for advertising. The period of advertising and PhD application is usually October to January.
  • The PhD candidates are selected by the supervisors and CASE partners and nominated for interview by the ACCE selection panel. Interviews take place in February. PhD studentships start in October. ACCE will be recruiting cohorts of PhD students up until those starting in October 2018.
  • CASE partners will have a contract with the hosting ACCE institution and will have a financial contribution towards the maintenance of the PhD student.

timeline

 

Catalogue of CASE studentships ideas

CASE Studentship idea titles

1. The ecology of the re-introduction of the white faced Darter Dragonfly

Expression of interest in collaboration

Helen Senn, Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, hsenn@rzss.org.uk

Maria Val Martin, University of Sheffield, m.valmartin@sheffield.ac.uk

Mike Began, University of Liverpool, mbegon@liv.ac.uk

Mike Siva-Jothy, University of Sheffield, m.siva-jothy@sheffield.ac.uk

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

2. Ecological connectivity in Cheshire grasslands

Expression of interest in collaboration

Maria Val Martin, University of Sheffield, m.valmartin@sheffield.ac.uk;

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

3. Aerosol pollution impacts on crop yields over Europe (or and India and China)

Expression of interest in collaboration

Maria Val Martin, University of Sheffield, m.valmartin@sheffield.ac.uk;

Ian Holmes, Innovate UK, ian.holmes@innovateuk.gov.uk

4.Environmental responses to Mesozoic extinctions

Expression of interest in collaboration

Matthew Collins University of York matthew.collins@york.ac.uk;

Simon Gregory, BGS, simongr@bgs.ac.uk

5. Biodiversity outcomes of different sized tropical forest (fragments and remaining large blocks) what is the most sustainable way to intensify). Could have scientific question about green Infrastructure in Europe

Expression of interest in collaboration

Jane Hill University of York jane.hill@york.ac.uk;

Jenny Hodgson University of Liverpool jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk;

Henry King Unilever henry.king@unilever.com

6. Fast evolution of pests on genetically modified crops

Expression of interest in collaboration

Lev Ginzburg, Applied Biomathematics, lev@ramas.com

Mike Siva-Jothy, University of Sheffield, m.siva-jothy@sheffield.ac.uk

7. Ecological recovery in restored lowland raised bogs

Expression of interest in collaboration

Kathryn Arnold University of York kathryn.arnold@york.ac.uk

Mike Morecroft Natural England mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk

Jenny Hodgson University of Liverpool jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

8. Coastal accretion at Nature reserve on Dee Estuary

Expression of interest in collaboration

Simon Gregory, BGS, simongr@bgs.ac.uk

Martin Varley, Cheshire Wildlife Trust, mvarley@cheshirewt.org.uk

9. Population genetics of natterjack leads in the Dee Estuary

Expression of interest in collaboration

Martin Varley Cheshire Wildlife Trust mvarley@cheshirewt.org.uk

Mike Began University of Liverpool mbegon@liv.ac.uk

Jenny Hodgson University of Liverpool jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

10. Validating endangered species listings and comparing methods used in different countries

Expression of interest in collaboration

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk;

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk;

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org;

Tom Webb University of Sheffield t.j.webb@sheffield.ac.uk;

Helen Senn Royal Zoological Society of Scotland hsenn@rzss.org.uk;

Henry King, Unilever, henry.king@unilever.com;

Kirill Horoshenkov, University of Sheffield, k.horoshenkov@sheffield.ac.uk;

Lev Ginzburg, Applied Biomathematics, lev@ramas.com

11. Landscape scenario planning and decision support tool

Expression of interest in collaboration

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk;

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk;

Lev Ginzburg, Applied Biomathematics, lev@ramas.com

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org

12. Habitat fragmentation dispersal and consequences for population structure

Expression of interest in collaboration

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org

Ben Hatchwell, University of Sheffield, b.hatchwell@sheffield.ac.uk;

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk;

Sally Haynes Cleem, CIEEM, sallyhayns@cieem.net;

David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage, david.obrien@snh.gov.uk;

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

13. Using biodiversity data to improve planning

Expression of interest in collaboration

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org;

Tom Webb, University of Sheffield, t.j.webb@sheffield.ac.uk;

Bill Baker Kew Royal Botanical Gardens w.baker@kew.org

14. Use of genetic methods to control invasive non-native species

Expression of interest in collaboration

David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage, david.obrien@snh.gov.uk;

Gerard Clover, RHS, gerardclover@rhs.org

15. Using new technologies to monitor ecosystems

Expression of interest in collaboration

Jane Hill, University of York, jane.hill@york.ac.uk;

Helen Senn, Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, hsenn@rzss.org.uk;

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk;

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk;

Kirill Horoshenkov, University of Sheffield, k.horoshenkov@sheffield.ac.uk;

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org;

Sally Haynes Cleem, CIEEM, sallyhayns@cieem.net;

Kathryn Arnold, University of York, kathryn.arnold@york.ac.uk

16. Using eDNA sampling to estimate population size

Expression of interest in collaboration

Helen Senn, Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, hsenn@rzss.org.uk;

Sally Haynes Cleem, CIEEM, sallyhayns@cieem.net;

Matthew Collins, University of York, matthew.collins@york.ac.uk

17.Water courses: Gas exchange and CO2 storage capacity

Expression of interest in collaboration

Gareth Phoenix, University of Sheffield, g.phoenix@sheffield.ac.uk;

Kirill Horoshenkov, University of Sheffield, k.horoshenkov@sheffield.ac.uk

18. Insect communication, foliage and environmental noise

Expression of interest in collaboration

Kathryn Arnold, University of York, kathryn.arnold@york.ac.uk;

Mike Siva-Jothy, University of Sheffield, m.siva-jothy@sheffield.ac.uk;

Kirill Horoshenkov, University of Sheffield, k.horoshenkov@sheffield.ac.uk

19. Design of urban green space to include different microclimates and microhabitats

Expression of interest in collaboration

Gerard Clover, RHS, gerardclover@rhs.org;

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk

20. Role of plant/fungal biodiversity in resilience

Expression of interest in collaboration

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk;

Gerard Clover, RHS, gerardclover@rhs.org;

David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage, david.obrien@snh.gov.uk;

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org

21. Climate impact on fire activities over Europe and consequences for air quality

Expression of interest in collaboration

Maria Val Martin, University of Sheffield, m.valmartin@sheffield.ac.uk

22. Feeding ecology of Atlantic Grey seals

Expression of interest in collaboration

23. Natural capital audits of Nature reserves in Cheshire

Expression of interest in collaboration

Martin Varley, Cheshire Wildlife Trust, mvarley@cheshirewt.org.uk

24. Role of leaf microflora in disease resistance of native, non-commercial trees

Expression of interest in collaboration

David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage, david.obrien@snh.gov.uk

25. Predicting species interactions in novel assemblages

Expression of interest in collaboration

26. Invasive species a framework for periodization

Expression of interest in collaboration

27. Does survey efforts affect confidence in results

Expression of interest in collaboration

Sally Haynes Cleem, CIEEM, sallyhayns@cieem.net

Collaborative projects ideas

Title: Long-term monitoring at landscape scale of species persistence and dispersal in mixed agricultural semi-natural landscapes [ particular interest in countryside stewardship certificate scheme]

Expression of interest in collaboration

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org

Matthew Collins, University of York, matthew.collins@york.ac.uk

Jane Hill, University of York, jane.hill@york.ac.uk

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

Henry King, Unilever, henry.king@unilever.com

David O’Brien, Scottish Natural Heritage, david.obrien@snh.gov.uk

Mike Morecroft, Natural England, mike.morecroft@naturalengland.org.uk

Title: Gardens and biodiversity (esp. birds and other verts)

Expression of interest in collaboration

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org

Ben Hatchwell, University of Sheffield, b.hatchwell@sheffield.ac.uk

Kathryn Arnold, University of York, kathryn.arnold@york.ac.uk

Gerard Clover, RHS, gerardclover@rhs.org

Title: Fire in the Earth systems

Expression of interest in collaboration Maria Val Martin, University of Sheffield, m.valmartin@sheffield.ac.uk

Colin Osborne University of Sheffield c.p.osborne@sheffield.ac.uk

Title: Mathematical modelling in ecology

Expression of interest in collaboration

Jenny Hodgson, University of Liverpool, jenny.hodgson@liverpool.ac.uk

Lev Ginzburg, Applied Biomathematics, lev@ramas.com

Mike Began, University of Liverpool, mbegon@liv.ac.uk

Isabel Douterelo University of Sheffield i.douterelo@sheffield.ac.uk

Helen Senn Royal Zoological Society of Scotland hsenn@rzss.org.uk

Urban water and ecosystems Isabel Douterelo University of Sheffield i.douterelo@sheffield.ac.uk

David Atkinson University of Liverpool davida@liv.ac.uk

David O’Brien Scottish Natural Heritage david.obrien@snh.gov.uk

Title: Science, Policy and the Public – Engaging overcoming barriers communicating – why is biodiversity important

Expression of interest in collaboration

Tom Webb, University of Sheffield, t.j.webb@sheffield.ac.uk

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org

Sally Haynes Cleem,

Gerard Clover, RHS, gerardclover@rhs.org

Alun Jones, University of Sheffield, ahjones1@sheffield.ac.uk

Rebecca Senior University of Sheffield rasenior1@sheffield.ac.uk

Title: Developing a methodology for measuring environmental impact post development

Expression of interest in collaboration

Henry King, Unilever, henry.king@unilever.com

Rob Robinson, BTO, rob.robinson@bto.org

Title: Early warning system – indicators, early indicators of ecosystems service decline; imminent tipping point

Expression of interest in collaboration

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org

Alun Jones, University of Sheffield, ahjones1@sheffield.ac.uk

Rebecca Senior, University of Sheffield, rasenior1@sheffield.ac.uk

Jane Hill, University of York, jane.hill@york.ac.uk

Simon Gregory, BGS, simongr@bgs.ac.uk

Isabel Douterelo, University of Sheffield, i.douterelo@sheffield.ac.uk

David Atkinson University of Liverpool davida@liv.ac.uk

Title: Treats as drivers of biodiversity, dynamics and evolution

Expression of interest in collaboration

Tom Webb, University of Sheffield, t.j.webb@sheffield.ac.uk

Bill Baker, Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, w.baker@kew.org

Title: Microbiome evolution and restoration

Expression of interest in collaboration

Isabel Douterelo, University of Sheffield, i.douterelo@sheffield.ac.uk

Helen Senn, Royal Zoological Society of Scotland, hsenn@rzss.org.uk

Matthew Collins, University of York, matthew.collins@york.ac.uk

Mike Siva-Jothy, University of Sheffield, m.siva-jothy@sheffield.ac.uk

Simon Gregory, BGS, simongr@bgs.ac.uk

Mike Began, University of Liverpool, mbegon@liv.ac.uk

Placements shop

Cheshire Wildlife Trust is keen to support one or more ACCE students in placements. They have outlined 3 ideas below, which could be developed according to your particular interests before putting together an application for ACCE placement support. If this idea interests you either for the near future or as an option later on in your PhD, please email Martin Varley, Director of Conservation (MVarley@cheshirewt.org.uk), to introduce yourself.

The ideas are:

1. A payment for ecosystems services scheme for the upper river Dane. We have a couple of projects running in the upper Dane relating to land management, one with United Utilities on compliance with the water framework directive working with land owners to improve water quality and one with the Environment Agency to slow the flow and reduce the impact of flooding through an implementation of natural flood measures. With the imminent demise of the common agricultural policy, I would be very interesting in someone doing some work on how a payment for ecosystems service scheme might operate to replace the existing subsidy system which could be integrated into this work. This would involve a programme of consultation with a load of stakeholders and some cost-benefit analysis work on markets and products, buyers and sellers. We will be working in the catchment for the next 5 years and it would be good during that time to see whether such a scheme could be piloted (depending on how things go nationally with the post-Brexit world).

2. A natural capital/ecosystems services map of Cheshire. I would be interested in assessing Cheshire’s natural capital. At the moment we have a pretty low baseline for wildlife information in the area. For example, we don’t have phase 1 data for the whole area. I am aware that it is possible to convert from remotely sensed data to habitat type. This can then be converted to ecosystem services for which a cost can be attached. So this is a GIS exercise that would require someone who is pretty good at mapping but also has a decent ecological head on them and if possible, knows a bit about economics.

3. The State of Nature report for Cheshire. There are a few iterations of this type of report floating about. The was a UK State of Nature report done in 2013. In September a new variation of the report focusing on individual countries (UK, Scotland, Wales) will be launched. We would be interested in zooming this type of analysis in at a county level. Again the source data is pretty random. We have a good biological records office here, and a number of local wildlife organisations focusing on single species. So it would require collating all that information and seeing whether it is possible to develop any time series for species from which conclusions can be drawn. The methodology is pretty fluid at the moment, but the two versions of the state of nature reporting could act as a guide for anyone taking this on.